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Af Problems- Canon 70D


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#1 GuyTal

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 09:36 AM

Hello!

 

After a while sitting on the decision I recently purchased a 400 5.6, to my 70d body.

Im trying to get some experience shooting birds. I went to a local fish pond, with great conditions, clear sky and low sun in early morning. while shooting birds in flight I used all the AF points, due to an even background. when I got home I saw that many of my photos are badly focused, even when the bird was not coming toward me. shooting with continuous AF...I have herd that the 70d's focusing system wasn't the best...can this be the issue? is it technique that I need to practice? would love any input.

thanks allot!

 

Guy. 



#2 elcab18

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 10:01 AM

Try single point focus and do your best to get it on the eye of the bird.

 

Doug



#3 GuyTal

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 11:42 AM

Try single point focus and do your best to get it on the eye of the bird.

 

thanks doug!

Im afraid that the task for birds in flight will be too difficult...



#4 P Bender

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 12:00 PM

thanks doug!
Im afraid that the task for birds in flight will be too difficult...

Nonsense! Bugs in flight is possible, birds are more easily accomplished. Start with larger slower birds.

Attached Files


Paul

Photos are a moment in time, that can only be captured once.

#5 GuyTal

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 12:15 PM

thanks guys but I dont feel that the problem is misfocusing on the eyes, even in big birds sometimes the whole body is not in focus...too often then id like 



#6 elcab18

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 03:38 PM

Multi-point focus is not the way to go for birds in flight, camera is easily fooled, it doesn't know what you are after and not focusing specifically on what you want.  Start off on bigger slower birds, they are easier.  Don't give up, it takes time!!!  If the eye and or head is in focus it will look good, if the wing is in focus and nothing else...it's trash!!

 

Best 


Annnddd....this is basic but maybe overlooked...f 6 - 8 or so, you need to be the judge and fast shutter speed1/1250 to 1/2000 depending ;) (for birds in flight)



#7 GuyTal

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 03:53 PM

thanks for the input everyone!



#8 PeterPP

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 10:31 AM

I agree with the single point af method and practice a lot :)

 

But I would first check out the kit to make sure it is actually focusing correctly and not missing focus due to some other reasons.

For instance my 120-300 with the sigma 2x tc has a serious backfocus issue, that was just barely correctable with the cameras microfocus adjustment.

70d has the microfocus feature I believe.

 

You can check it easily using the dot-tune method

FredMiranda site has a printable target, mid-point calculator and link to the same video I attached here.

Canon version: http://www.fredmiran...m/topic/1187247

Nikon version; http://www.fredmiran...m/topic/1187638

 

Note: that Canon recommendation is to use at least 50x the lens focal length for the calibration target distance, on a 400mm lens that so 20,000mm or 65.6 feet.

 


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#9 grimlock361

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Posted 24 July 2016 - 08:02 PM

Focusing on the eye is key with all wildlife but with BIF it's a bit hard core. Try stopping down to f8 or 10, use group af and just try to aim for the head and neck area. This is the method I use the most. All the BIF in my portfolio were shot with this method.

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#10 RAH1861

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 09:35 AM

I agree with everyone - single-point AF and f8!! I have used a 400f5.6L lens for years with my 60D (now have an 80d), and always do it that way, with good results. I will have to say that I do not do BIF much. As far as focusing on the eye, yes that is what you want, but unless you are very close it can be pretty difficult even for something that isn't even moving, IMHO. I just take a lot of shots and hope a few of them are what I want! Good luck!


Rich





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