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Requesting Feedback On Zion Photo


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#1 Argolich

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 03:45 PM

I have a friend visiting us here in Utah from out of town who is just starting with HDR and tone mapping.  He is looking for some feedback from other enthusiasts.  I can't remember all the codes (apologies!) but criticism and critiques are welcome and appreciated.  I gave him some tips on this but want him to find his own "eye" so to speak but any suggestions or comments would be welcome.  This was taken on the south end of Zion June 8th.  

 

3 shot composite @ ISO 200 - processed in Photomatix Pro.    Thanks in advance for any feedback.

 

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#2 David Pavlich

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 06:33 PM

You can see the evidence of the blending in the trees.  I used Photomatix Pro 5 for real estate since they have a real estate setting in the natural menu.  I really like PP5 for tone mapping.  For nature stuff, I use Light Rooms HDR Merge.  It does very well with shots like the one above.

 

I'd probably reduce the saturation of the sky just a bit.  Otherwise, it's a nice shot.

 

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#3 Argolich

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Posted 10 June 2016 - 10:41 AM

Thank you David.  We appreciate the input.  

 

Tom



#4 RAH1861

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 06:02 AM

I had a similar problem with an HDR shot at Zion - the damn trees! I find the "ghost" tree look to be enough of a distraction that I gave up on the idea, even though I know that the cliffs are the main point of such shots. Maybe there is masking available in some HDR software to perhaps only use the tree portion of ONE image (the middle one, probably)?


Rich


#5 Kerry Gordon

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Posted 11 June 2016 - 06:40 PM

I'm no expert on this but as I've been studying long exposure photography this same problem comes up.  Photo stacking seems to be the way most deal with it.  In other words take the long exposure for, say, the silky water effect but then take a regular exposure for the surrounding grass and trees which may be moving and then stack them.  I don't see why this wouldn't work for your situation.  But I'd like to hear from others with more experience.  I plan to be doing a lot of long exposure photography when I'm on my annual month long canoe trip in August so I'd like to hear the best way to handle this problem.



#6 RAH1861

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Posted 12 June 2016 - 09:01 AM

I've been thinking about this some more and realized that you don't really need masking ability in your HDR software. You can do it afterward.

What I mean is, process all your shots for the HDR composite first. Then open that HDR image in a regular image editor (I use PaintShop Pro), then paste the middle non-HDR image as a separate layer. Then carefully erase (mask, whatever) the moving portions (trees, water, etc) of the HDR version, leaving the middle non-HDR image showing in those areas.

I tried this with my Zion shot and it works quite well. An image like the one originally posted above would be even easier since the trees are only in the very bottom area and might be easy to remove (from the HDR layer)

This is very much the same idea as Kerry's focus stacking idea, except all you need is the original HDR shots (assuming one of them is a reasonable exposure, usually the middle one).


Rich





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