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Engagement Photos


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#1 DiamondDave47

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Posted 21 January 2016 - 09:28 PM

I've been asked by some friends to do their engagement photo's, "in the snow."

 

I've never done portrait shots, much less "in the snow".  

 

I do not have any flashes, reflectors etc, and may not need them... "in the snow".

 

Anyone have any suggestions or point me to some decent do's/do nots?



#2 K_Georgiadis

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 12:02 AM

There are videos included with the SDP book that discuss portrait photography as well as one on exposure issues when photographing in the snow. It would be silly for me to try to recap Tony's detailed tips but I can touch on the broad principles:

With snow, the camera will tend to underexpose by trying to convert the white into 18% grey. If you are shooting in aperture or shutter priority, you will need to use exposure compensation of +1 to +2 stops.

Choose the background carefully; you don't want anything distracting, For a portrait (head shot) it is generally recommended to blur the background. You can accomplish that by using a large aperture (small f stop number). You will get more of a blurred background by moving back and zooming in.

#3 TinaW249

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 01:47 AM

HI Dave. Be sure to ask your friends to be VERY SPECIFIC in what they're wanting for these Engagement photos. Do they want the L'ville skyline in the background? If so....do you know a good place to achieve that? If not, message me. I'm from the area. You're aware that downtown has the horse drawn carriage rides....maybe they'd like a photo in the carriage, warm blanket on their laps w/ some key L'ville backdrop? Maybe even the Gentleman helping his soon to be bride down from the carriage? What about the Belle of Louisville who have day & night Cruises for compelling photos??

After speaking w/ the couple, and finding out venues they'd like to use....I'd go to these places beforehand to check out lighting, traffic trouble spots, any rules or regulations prior to using, spot any possible key objects to keep OUT of the photos OR vice versa. If they want some night photos, remember the lighting on the Kennedy Bridge....& there's the new walking bridge as well w/ some pretty cool different colored lighting.

I hope that w/ these ideas, one of the other members can give you specifics on dealing w/ these issues of lighting, etc, that is, IF the couple should happen to choose any of these ideas.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.

~Tina



#4 David Pavlich

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 10:40 AM

What Tina said.  Before you worry about cameras and settings and the like, get every detail you can think of on paper....everything.  My son shoots this sort of thing and has contracts that fit each situation.  You don't want to be at the location and have them tell you that this isn't what they had in mind, friend or not.  You have to base this on your time.  Very, very important.

 

David


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#5 K_Georgiadis

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 04:25 PM

Excellent advice by David and Tina; you need to know what it is that they expect from you. If you still want ideas of your own, google "snow portrait photography," choose "images" and you will see a number of examples.






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