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Twilight Architectural Shots


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#1 Photogirl

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 03:28 PM

Hi!

 

I have been shooting RE for about 3 years now and have a client that called TODAY asking that I shoot a large home TOMORROW with a twilight shot.  Having never shot a twilight shot does anyone have some advice for me?

 

Thanks!

Darlene :)



#2 elcab18

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 03:46 PM

Practice shots tonight ;)

I'm hoping someone else chimes in that actually can offer quality advice. Good Luck

Doug


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#3 P Bender

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 07:41 PM

Twilight is a very hard time to get enough light to properly expose your shot. An underexposed shot will result in noise when you bring the exposure up in post processing.

My advice would be to get on location before loosing the light. In post production you can always lower the exposure without any problems.

If you must shoot at twilight bring a flash if you have one, set your exposure compensation up to compensate, DEFINITELY bring a tripod and use longer shutter times.

The most important thing is that you review the photos before leaving, on a laptop would be preferred. The back of the camera, if you must. Be sure to check the histogram!

Good luck!
Paul

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#4 Photogirl

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 07:59 PM

Paul, thanks for your input.  There are no foundational plantings to hide a flash behind.  When you say to put flash compensation up....can you explain a bit more?  I was thinking I would be metering for the sky then quickly meter for the brightest light showing through a window, then possibly merge in PS.  Can you share on where/how to meter?  The house is about 20+ years old, 2 stories.  thanks so much!!  Darlene :)



#5 P Bender

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:43 PM

I would meter on the subject, which is the building. The exposure compensation is used to increase or decrease the exposure if the camera's metering system is not exposing what you want correctly. That a sample shot and check the histogram, getting readings into the fifth box on the right is necessary to avoid noise.

There are several ways to accomplish this, the first as mentioned above, slow shutter speed using a tripod. The second would be to increase the size of the aperture, but this reduces the depth of field. Third would be to raise the iso setting. I would avoid this option, if possible. The 7d mark ii has noise issues around iso 3200.

My recommendations are a tripod, and longer exposure, first choice. Larger aperture, faster shutter speed handheld, second choice.

I do not know what the lighting conditions will be so you need to review you photos after each shot, and judge if they are acceptable.

The best advice would to shoot under more favorables lighting conditions, if possible.
Paul

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#6 Photogirl

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:36 PM

Thanks Paul.  This client specifically asked for a twilight shot.  I will be making some exterior shots earlier in the day in case I have an epic fail for the twilight.  I appreciate all you good advice!!  :)



#7 K_Georgiadis

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:07 PM

You already have received excellent recommendations. The idea of taking shots earlier in the day is your insurance policy because it is fairly easy to give the image "the twilight look" in Photoshop, using luminosity masks. But don't tell your client! :-))

#8 David Pavlich

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Posted 13 November 2015 - 09:48 AM

I'm late for this thread, don't know how I missed it, but first, how'd it turn out?

 

My recommendation would have been to do it with multiple exposures as in HDR.  I did a similar shoot.  It wasn't twilight, but the home was in a wooded setting, so some of the home was in heavy shadows, some in Sunlight.  I took one image at ISO100, f8 in AV.  I checked what the camera chose as the proper f stop.  For the sake of this post, let's say the camera chose 1/125.  Tripod mandatory.

 

Then I set the camera to Manual, ISO100, f8 and started at 1/30, then 1/50, 1/80, 1/125, 1/200, 1/320, and last, 1/500.  Put them in Light Room and did a Lens Correction only on the middle exposure, 1/125.  Then Sync them in LR.  Export to Photomatix Pro 15 (V-15 has a Fusion Real Estate setting) and choose Fusion Natural.  I chose Real Estate for this particular shot because it added a bit of contrast.  Make no other adjustments in Photomatix.  I never use Tone Mapping for real estate.

 

Note that I went 2 stops between exposures.  I get much better results than 1 stop.  My cameras have the bracketing in camera, but it's one stop increments.

 

Send it back to LR and make your final adjustments there.  This way, you pretty much have the whole lighting range covered and a lot less chance of introducing noise.

 

David


'When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane, you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash.'

 





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