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Nd Filters For Wide Angle?

ND Landscape Neutral Density Wide angle

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#1 zguy

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:19 AM

Hi.  I am interested in buying ND filters for my A6000.  I will be using my 10-18mm mostly which accepts 62mm filters. It seems to makes sense to buy ones that will fit my largest lenses when purchasing them and then use step up rings when using the filters with smaller lenses.  I will most likely be getting a full frame camera in the future and most of the lenses I like will accept 72mm filters.  As of today I have a 62mm lens so I will need to use two steps up rings assuming I buy 72mm filters.  One from 62-67mm and another from 67-72mm.  

 

Does anyone see an issue with this approach?

 

Also, how do I know what type to get?  I assume it depends on how bright my scene is.  I want to smooth out water in landscape shots.  ND4?, ND8, etc? 

 

In addition I read that I need to purchase ND filters specifically for my wide angle lens as using ones not specific to that application will yield poor results as well as vignetting.  Is this true or just hype?



#2 Chimpy

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 12:17 PM

Buy Cokin square filters and different sized mounting rings, they do 2 kits for different sized camera systems.

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#3 zguy

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 01:51 PM

Buy Cokin square filters and different sized mounting rings, they do 2 kits for different sized camera systems.

Chimpy

Curious why do you prefer this setup over individual screw on ND filters?  Cost, quality, etc?



#4 Chimpy

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 03:25 PM

For 1 it's way cheaper, 2 you don't have to buy different filters for different sized lenses, you just buy adapter rings, 3 you can use multiple filters in the holder at one time without the risk of vignetting due to stacking screw on filters.

I hope this helps Chimpy.

#5 RAH1861

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 05:29 PM

As of today I have a 62mm lens so I will need to use two steps up rings assuming I buy 72mm filters.  One from 62-67mm and another from 67-72mm.  

 

Does anyone see an issue with this approach?

 

You can buy a 62 to 72 step-up ring - i.e. you only need ONE. It is better to have as few as possible to minimize the thickness, it's more convenient, and step rings are very inexpensive.


Rich


#6 Bill Peppas

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 07:45 PM

A major issue with adapters instead of screw in filters is LIGHT LEAKING.

Yup.

It happens.

With Cokin and with Lee ( seriously Lee, you're unjustifiably expensively overpricing your products, yet they have several fundamental flaws! ), it happens.

 

Unless you have or going to have a lens with a protruding front element ( thus no filter thread ) I cannot justify the purchase of a holder system with square filters.

And of course, the vignetting for example from stacking 2 threaded ND filters isn't outside the Dynamic Range of even a very bad sensor ( let's say 10 stops DR ? ) to make it impossible to simply fix in post processing.



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#7 P Bender

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 08:00 PM

I purchased an assortment of filters for my largest diameter lens (82mm), and two step up rings for my smaller lenses. It was very affordable for the three nd filters and step up rings. I went this route primarily because of limited use that I would have, do only a small amount of landscape photography.
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#8 zguy

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:23 PM

Thanks for all the replies. I hate to ask but how do I know how many stops I need? I know it's specific to the brightness or light conditions.

#9 Bill Peppas

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 02:05 AM

Thanks for all the replies. I hate to ask but how do I know how many stops I need? I know it's specific to the brightness or light conditions.

 

You need a 10 stop filter for this task.



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#10 RAH1861

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 08:24 AM

It is difficult to know how many stops you need in filtering. As you guessed, it depends on the conditions at the time. Smooth water does not require all that long a shutter speed - I think it's about 1/5 second, maybe, so it isn't all that difficult to achieve. You can always add a polarizer to get more filtering.

 

I think Tony's book may cover this topic.

 

Concerning square filters, they are best when using GRADUATED ND filters, because you can slide them up and down, and thereby position the transition exactly where you need it. For full ND filters, round ones are probably better. But myself, since I already have the Cokin holders and adapters, I have graduated and full ND filters for Cokin and like them fine.


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#11 Bill Peppas

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 11:18 PM

Depends on how smooth you want the water to become.
For absolute smoothness depending on the flow, etc, you may have to go well over 30s.

Most of my water shots are well over 5s.



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#12 zguy

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 03:12 AM

I'm guessing my lens hood will not work for lenses that are using step up rings?

#13 RAH1861

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 06:26 AM

You guessed right. And for polarizer filters, you even have a problem when you have the exact correct size (no step ring), because how do you rotate the filter when you have the lens hood attached at the same time? With great difficulty.


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#14 Mrgoatee

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 01:51 PM

I use the cokin filter holder with kood filters (less colour shift than cokin). I have to be honest I have never suffered light leakage from this and tbh especially with long exposures you are more likely to suffer back lighting coming through your view finder so remember to cover that up. I use a 16mm wide angle and suffer from no vignetting. I'm not sure but I believe you can buy a lens hood to go over the filter holder.
I would advice taking a look on the lee website, they have some wonderful videos by some outstanding landscape photographers on how to use the square filter system properly.

#15 Bill Peppas

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 09:05 PM

The light leak especially with the Lee SW150 kit for the Nikon 14-24 IS NOTORIOUSLY FAMOUS on the web and of course amongst several pro photographers, way more pro and honest than the ones doing Lee a favor on their site :D

 

For example: http://www.mattk.com...ee-big-stopper/

 

For those wanting to believe what simply is false... Lee came up with an add-on Lightshield ( years after the release of the problematic holder kit :D )... which is also faulty, it doesn't work properly, even the "fix" needs a fix to work properly :D



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#16 Terry W

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 09:45 PM

Just a little tip I found tonight regarding view finder light leaking. Not sure on Nikon or other brands but seems the Canon strap has a view finder cover that comes with. Pop of the rubber eye piece and pop on the little plastic cover on the strap.

 

I never knew what that little piece was for.


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#17 P Bender

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 10:25 PM

Just a little tip I found tonight regarding view finder light leaking. Not sure on Nikon or other brands but seems the Canon strap has a view finder cover that comes with. Pop of the rubber eye piece and pop on the little plastic cover on the strap.
 
I never knew what that little piece was for.


Thanks Terry, I didn't know that either.
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#18 JestePhotography

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Posted 20 September 2015 - 10:39 PM

The D4s has a little switch that flips a diaphragm cover in place at the viewfinder. I don't know why all cameras do not have this.

#19 Bill Peppas

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 02:14 AM

Most cameras come with a viewfinder cover in the box... how people do not know what it is about while they are supposed to be practicing landscapes, seascapes & long exposures is beats me :P

The D810 and the D4s have the nice switch on-camera that pops down a cap without having the need to remove the eyepiece and install an eyecap, that's very convenient.
Should've been on every camera years now...



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#20 JestePhotography

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 04:18 AM

:) it's handy as heck!





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