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12 Vs 14 Bit Raw (Nikon D610)

raw 12 bit 14 bit ffs

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#1 Thomas Stedtenfeldt

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 02:50 AM

Hi, I was wondering if anyone has any idea about the difference between 12 and 14 bit raw shooting.

It makes a LOT of difference when it comes to my cameras frames per second buffer.

 

If when shooting wildlife photography the buffer is important, then why not get the most out of it lowering the bit? Personally, I can't even tell the difference, but It would be nice to have a better understanding on what I'm loosing out on.

 

//Thomas



#2 JestePhotography

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 03:34 AM

More is better for IQ. You may not see the difference if just posting to the web..printing large on the other hand....
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#3 Thomas Stedtenfeldt

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 03:49 AM

OK, thanks. It sounds like in that case that the added buffer to get that ONE shot might be more interesting than being able to print it huge if you are an amateur?

//Thomas



#4 lallen

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 02:34 PM

Higher bit depth is supposed to give you better color data

#5 JestePhotography

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Posted 09 July 2015 - 04:51 PM

I would go highest quality. If you are worried about 1 frame/second difference? Buy a D4s, you can have 11 fps andddd shoot 14bit.
With the new XQD cards read/write 400MBits/sec 100 in the buffer and never buffer out.
Least that's what I did. Nope I don't make a living off of photography, it's just fun as heck.

#6 Shannon Lawrence

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 01:12 AM

According to research 12-bit image files can store up to 68 billion different shades of color. 14-bit image files store up to 4 trillion shades. There are many upsides to shooting 12-bit instead of 14-bit. The files are smaller, hence your camera’s buffer doesn’t fill up as fast, allowing longer action sequences to be caught before buffering out. 12-bit files take up less space on your memory cards – great for if you are on vacation without the ability to download your images every night. You can save money because you don’t need to purchase as many gigs of storage. Likewise, 12-bit hogs less space on your drives at home and the same number of 12-bit files load faster than if they were 14-bit. Lastly some cameras, such as Nikon’s D7100 and D7200 achieve higher burst rates when shot in 12-bit than in 14-bit. For more information and camera setting options on this concepts you can refer to Nikon d610 Manual



#7 grimlock361

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 02:40 AM

You wont see a difference outside of large color and luminance shifts in post. Its certainly not worse than jpeg and even that will do if you nail the exposure.

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