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#1 Lakej1

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 04:57 PM

I love taking pictures at weddings and have only ever done so as a guest, but always make a photo book as a gift, One thing that I would love is some tips on, is the camera set up from you seasoned photographers. Changing from in doors to outdoors, changing in lighting, sun in sun out ?(I am in the UK!) how is best to respond quickly? do you tend to stay in manual or do you use aperture priority? Although when I have done that I get annoyed that it might choose a low shutter speed ( although this might just be my camera I am due an upgrade)

#2 JestePhotography

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 07:31 PM

I shoot in manual mode 99% of the time. Sometimes A-priority when I need to switch EV on the fly.

#3 P Bender

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 08:44 PM

If you do not regularly shoot in manual mode is suggest that you practice in varying lighting conditions. The day of the wedding will be fast paced, and the bride and groom want properly exposed photos. If you are not sufficiently proficient at reading a histogram, and making the correct adjustments on the fly, I suggest shooting in aperture priority. Set your ISO to auto, color balance to auto, and adjust the aperture to affect the amount of background blur you want. Again I would practice, practice, and then practice some more. When when most of your shots are in focus, properly exposed, and are not excessively noisy, then you will be ready for the big day. Good luck!


Paul

Photos are a moment in time, that can only be captured once.

#4 Lakej1

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 12:20 AM

Thank you, for your comments I will keep going practicing! I probably don't use the histogram enough so that's a good point. Also I haven't previously set the ISO to auto and I guess that may help explain why it sometimes chooses a low shutter speed. Thanks for your time

#5 Michael Tam

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 01:04 AM

I don't do weddings professionally, just on request for fun.

 

Usually use aperture priority and set everything else to auto, within the parameters I feel work best after making a judgement at the site. I save that as a preset on my camera to quickly go back to that default if I have changed settings to adapt to a specific need at a moment.

 

I personally use two cameras, one with a wide to short-tele zoom (24-80mm), and another with a prime telephoto (90mm for indoors, or 150mm for outdoors) just for portraits to obtain maximum background blur. 

 

I shoot everything in RAW, and do most of the work in post-process later, when I have time. During a wedding, everything is timed and scheduled, so I find it better to shoot first, post-process easy to fix mistakes later.

 

It's good to find a time to shoot before the wedding day events if you can. It's less hectic, and you can control lighting more optimally with a setup if you have the resources.

 

Also if you like interacting with people, you can get them to do some funny stuff in a group, and get a unique photo out of it. 



#6 redcat

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 04:37 AM

I think Aperture priority is very "user friendly", just pay attention to your shutter speed when you shoot to avoid blur (low shutter speed), increase ISO if you see your shutter speed < 1/focal length.
Shoot raw and everything auto, you can change them later in PP ^^ there will be thousands of photos so a good work-flow will be time-saver ;)



#7 geedee

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 06:17 AM

I claim no expertise and like you have taken a couple of wedding pics as a guest. If you are seeking to improve your pics perhaps if you scope out the venues both church and reception or a nearby park if the weather permits, thus before the event you might have a pic or two created in your mind ahead of time which could provide you with the extra bit of time to capture a better pic than might otherwise be possible....As for auto ISO, It sure has it`s place though if you screw up the settings for the scene and auto ISO makes up for the wrong exposure... you will perhaps be disappointed, though I suspect you could determine the max ISO acceptable in camera for all your pics before the event which may help...?  Just thinking in type..



#8 Lakej1

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 12:58 AM

Thanks for all off your comments and advice. I have been using raw and now need to get better at post processing. So much to learn but all good fun!

#9 Lakej1

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 12:58 AM

Thanks for all off your comments and advice. I have been using raw and now need to get better at post processing. So much to learn but all good fun!
Thanks for all off your comments and advice. I have been using raw and now need to get better at post processing. So much to learn but all good fun!




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