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Help Stitching/shooting A Panorama


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#1 ebit

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 03:34 PM

Hello,

 

I was wondering if anyone can offer me some advice on shooting for panoramas.  I tried doing several shoots sweeping left to right, up and down for a panorama but for some reason, photoshop can't seem to blend them well together.  I tried using all the shots, I tried using some of them, here is part of a sample result I am getting.  

 

Attached File  Pano.jpg   42KB   0 downloads

 

Can anyone offer me some shooting tips?  if i'm sweeping up and down, left and right, should I be trying to crouch and tip toe to keep the plane of focus or is it ok to rotate my body as I'm shooting?

 

Thanks

 



#2 pbunny

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 04:23 PM

An advantage to using a camera with built in panorama software is it has points to line up which help. It will also maintain all your settings the sames for all your shots. Try shooting in manual mode. Set iso dont leave it on auto. Lastly, use a tripod.

Hope this helps.



#3 Geez

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 06:05 PM

As already pointed out, set camera on manual and maintain the same exposure throughout. If it is on auto or if you try to adjust the exposure for every shot the overlapping areas will not match in exposure. This means no auto ISO either.


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#4 RAH1861

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 06:09 PM

I think you should start with just a wide one - forget the up and down for now. Take your shots in vertical format (portrait) so you get more height. Overlap each but at least 1/3. As pbunny says, use manual exposure (so it doesn't change), a tripod, and use manual focus (again, so it doesn't change). Good luck!

Edit: you can use autofocus and an auto exposure mode to establish initial settings, but then switch to manual on both and start the sequence.

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#5 pbunny

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 09:53 PM

How did it work out for you?



#6 ebit

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 09:24 PM

Hi, I did shoot in manual mode, but without a tripod.  I experimented further and I think it might have been just the way I was shooting because now it works.

 

Its not 100% and I don't have such a high keeper rate but the goal was to be able to shoot wide angle shots, have a shallow DOF, and get that compression from a longer focal length.  

 

I went to the park and tried it on still subjects.  This one didn't stitch perfectly, but its close enough that its hard to really tell where the mistakes are to an untrained eye.  I know over time, my technique will improve, and its just a matter of getting a vision as to how much to frame, and where I started and ended the shots so I have better overlay.

 

Also, I noticed with shots that didn't work, I overdid the overlaying.  Once I used every second or third shot, it started stitching together properly.

 

Attached File  pano sample.jpg   216.33KB   0 downloads

 



#7 Dave Clarke

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 02:57 AM

From my own expereince using Photoshop to stitch panoramas even when you do everything right Photoshop can still produce errors, like a very common one for me is it will stitch the images but it won't blend them, so it won't be seamless, it will be like a puzzle, other times it won't blend them properly or at all. I have to close Photoshop and reopen it to get it to do it seamlessly.



#8 ebit

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 09:48 PM

whoa dave! i thought it was just me! There were times where it just didn't stitch, and the following day it worked.  Other times it stitched properly, but I didn't bother saving it then i go back and restitch, it doesn't work!  There might be some inconsistency with their stitching algorithm?



#9 Dave Clarke

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 07:01 PM

I'me not shure, but it does it quite often, i just have to close Photoshop and open it and start from scratch again. in some cases i've had to switch to different software...sometimes it will work better in other software like Microsoft ICE or Hugin (which are both free). 



#10 Samantha Schannon

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Posted 24 March 2015 - 08:50 AM

In my experience there are a few things to remember when doing these.  The first is that you need to have overlap, so when you’re moving your camera in sweeping motions capturing a scene, make sure you're moving in smaller increments and overlapping the images.  The second thing is you need to stop your camera from re-exposing each frame. I set a button on my camera to the lock auto exposure and I make sure I'm holding that for each image I take so that it doesn't try to make adjustments as I go.  Lastly when you get into lightroom, make sure you don't forget to do your lens correction before sending over to Photoshop or you will get unexplainable dark splotches on your image (I learned that one the hard way). You can then "send to Photoshop as panorama" right from lightroom which is how I do them.


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