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#1 kevkelsar

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Posted 03 March 2015 - 05:18 PM

I offered to shoot my first wedding at the first of the year for some friends.  My goal is to eventually be a wedding photographer, but I know I still have a ways to go before I can ever advertise myself as such.  I was very open with the bride and groom beforehand about my limitations (specifically gear), but if I didn't do it then they would have likely had a bunch of cell phone snap shots for their memories.

 

A little more background, this was a VERY low budget wedding organized by members of our church community in about two weeks.  All decorations were donated, cake and flowers (bouquet, boutonnieres, etc.) made and donated by a church member, and the wedding was held in our church because it was a free place to do it.  If any of you are familiar with churches for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, you'll know they are NOT great places for photography.  The whole wedding, except for a few ring shots, was shot using my Nikon D5200 with the 50mm 1.8G lens and a Yongnuo 568-EX speedlight.  Posed shots had the speedlight off camera on a stand shooting through a white umbrella while the preparation, ceremony, and reception had the flash on camera using a Rogue Flashbender.  I know I committed a major photography sin, but I had just purchased the speedlight and modifiers (Rogue, stand, umbrella, triggers, batteries) just a week before the wedding so I didn't have much experience with them.

 

I would love some good CC on how to improve my technique.  Yes, I found out quickly how crazy and fast paced a wedding day can be, but the photographer is still expected to get results.  Please don't CC on my website...I know it needs a lot of work.  :)  Thanks in advance!

 

http://www.kevinreml...artley-wedding/



#2 Samantha Schannon

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 11:53 PM

First, you need more self confidence! The way you prefaced this I was expecting terrible photos to be quite honest, but yours were great! Especially for your first wedding AND  crash coursing yourself on speedlights only a week prior.  You did a great job with exposure and you didn't forget the detail shots.  For a first wedding I'd say you nailed it.  You have a natural eye, and I think if you keep it up you will just get even better.  I think you might want to invest in a zoom lens especially if you're going to be doing more weddings.  There are lots of times when you will not be able to get as close as you were able to get in this wedding.  What did the bride and groom think of the images?  


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#3 geedee

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 03:41 AM

I held off commenting waiting for others more experienced to comment first. I have taken pics at a a few weddings of friends and relatives though would never have the courage that you have shown in being THE photographer. You did a great job, and I think that there is great reward in capturing an image that the happy couple treasure as a memory of the day, and if you can do that,
I suspect you have done well enough. People pics ain`t my thing, just do not have the skill to work that closely with folk, that
you and others do. The wedding pics I took were set up by the professionals so I was poaching to some extent, though learned a bit from watching the Pro while keeping out of the way and trying not to divert eye contact of the subjects when the pro was shooting, and from those limited experiences I would suggest volunteering as an assistant or second photographer at weddings might be
worthwhile, or if not there is plenty of folk sharing such experiences and advice on the WWW. Good luck.

#4 kevkelsar

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Posted 09 March 2015 - 12:26 PM

Thank you very much!  Yes, a zoom lens is definitely my next major purchase/upgrade.  I felt like I was a bit too obtrusive at times needing to get so close.  I'm also looking to get a standard zoom lens so I can get some wider shots when needed because I felt really cramped with the 50mm on my crop sensor in the smaller prep room.

 

Thanks again for the encouragement!  I know I have a lot to learn and experience, so the vote of confidence sure does help.  :)


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#5 Petbro30

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 02:17 AM

Well I have to agree, I think concidering it was your first attempt and the limited equipment you did a fantastic job. Well done mate and yea a decent zoom will help loads and give you a much narrower depth of field to get rid of the unwanted backgrounds and really make your subject stand out. Keep it up my friend.

#6 ebit

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 12:51 AM

given your gear and your constraints, I must say, you did an awesome job.  

 

I was faced with a similar situation (my hobby is a secret to some), and my friend lent me his Rebel T3i, 50mm 1.8, and a really old yongnuo flash and I had to shoot a really budget wedding with only 30 mins to practice and configure his camera to my preferred settings.  It made me REALLY thankful of my gear and cured me (temporarily) of GAS.

 

I must say though, your shots turned out much better than mine though I felt like my subjects did not seem to care about photography and did not want to do any portrait sessions.  Hahahah less work for me I guess!

 

As for some critique, this is purely subjective, but I would definitely prefer something slightly warmer color temp

 

DSC_1294 - you could probably not include this photo unless of course this person or event was quite significant... it looks a bit awkward

DSC_0841 - stepping slightly further back would make for a better composition to get more of the groom's head

DSC_0994 - stepping a bit closer and centering the hands joining would make a better composition as it shows some symmetry, creates a shallower DOF, and puts the attention on the exchange of rings (a black and white edit of this would also be nice) 

DSC_1046 - not sure if this is doable given your circumstances with a 50mm and some previously tight shots you did with the cake, but stepping back (or using a wider focal length and showing the cake with the couple feeding each other would add more context.  However, I can see why that was difficult or even impossible given your circumstances

DSC_0976-2 - tight shots like this, position the subjects further away from the background, to get a creamier bokeh  (you nailed it on DSC_0911-2-Edit)

 

As a general advice for weddings and candids, snap several photos and pay attention to the small details, even the background.  While its not a big deal, there are photos of people caught mid blink, which you could mitigate by snapping several shots (DSC_1159)

 

Your photos of the wedding cake, flowers and ring are great.



#7 cuda

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 01:48 PM

I think you did a very nice job, it shows that you don't always need high priced equipment to take quality photos. Keep up the good work.

#8 P Bender

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 03:08 PM

You have given a true gift to the happy couple. The moments in that you captured, they can look back and smile at.
Paul

Photos are a moment in time, that can only be captured once.




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