Jump to content


Photo

Back-Button Focusing


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 David X. Li

David X. Li

    Super Geek

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • LocationBoston, MA
  • Lenses:EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
    EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM,
    EF 40mm F/2.8 STM Pancake
  • Flashes:Yongnuo YN-565 EX
  • Camera Body or Bodies:650D

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:21 PM

Do you use back-button focusing, and why? For anyone who hasn't gotten to the right spot in SDP, back-button focusing is where you bind autofocus to a button on the back of the camera instead of the shutter button. Here's a video of how to do it on the T4i.

 

Personally, I use back-button focusing so I don't accidentally focus on something in the foreground. When I hand the camera off to someone else, I just switch it back to Automatic Mode, which ignores the back-button setting.



Awards Bar:


#2 Rich Cooper

Rich Cooper

    Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationCastro Valley CA
  • Lenses:Tamron EF 28-300 mm XR DI (VC) f3.5 - 6.3 Macro Zoom
    Canon EF-S 18-55 mm f3.5 - 5.6
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon EOS 6D
    Canon EOS Rebel XT

Posted 02 September 2013 - 11:48 PM

I use the Canon 6D, and it has a dedicated back button focus. I am just learning how to use it. So far, so good.

Right now what I like most is that I won't have to worry about "premature shutter release" because I pushed the focus button too far, thus releasing the shutter.

This will be especially nice with a moving object, and in cases where taking the picture may be a one shot deal, i.e. bringing attention to yourself, scaring away an animal, etc. 

Could you please elaborate on your comment about avoiding accidently focusing on something in the foreground.

I'm not sure how you feel that using a separate focusing button accomplishes this. 



#3 David X. Li

David X. Li

    Super Geek

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • LocationBoston, MA
  • Lenses:EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
    EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM,
    EF 40mm F/2.8 STM Pancake
  • Flashes:Yongnuo YN-565 EX
  • Camera Body or Bodies:650D

Posted 03 September 2013 - 05:13 PM


Could you please elaborate on your comment about avoiding accidently focusing on something in the foreground.

I'm not sure how you feel that using a separate focusing button accomplishes this. 

 

Sure thing. Imagine that you're photographing someone at the end of a long dinner table. If you use shutter focusing, then if you accidentally let go of the button, it might refocus on someone closer the next time you snap. This won't happen if you back-button focus on your intended target.



Awards Bar:


#4 David Thorman

David Thorman

    Super Geek

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 386 posts
  • LocationNewcastle UK
  • Lenses:Tamron 70-200 2.8
    Nikon 18-55 3.5-5.6
    Nikon 35 1.8
    Nikon 16-35 1.4
    Sigma 70-300 4-5.6
  • Flashes:Nikon SB700, Neewer TT520, Unomat 320TCD
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Nikon D800
    Nikon D5100

Posted 03 September 2013 - 06:13 PM

I have just switched on my D5100 and getting there with it but its hard to swap over.


“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”
Henri Cartier-Bresson

Only 6700 to go till I get the good one then :wacko:


#5 Wayne Mercure

Wayne Mercure

    Advanced Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Lenses:18 - 55 / 3.5 - 5.6
    55 - 200 / 4 - 5.6
  • Flashes:On camera
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Nikon D5100
    Canon AE-1

Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:13 PM

I also just switched on my D5100. Funny thing is it feels more comfortable to me than the button focus. I can focus and then just work on my composition and not worry if the camera is focusing on something else.


  • Rush2112guy likes this

#6 Shaun Stanich

Shaun Stanich

    Post Master

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • LocationBrainerd, MN
  • Lenses:Canon EFS 18-55MM
    Canon EF 75-300 Zoom
    Tamron-F AF Tele-Converter 2x
  • Flashes:Sunpak Digiflash 3000
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon Rebel T3

Posted 08 September 2013 - 12:47 AM

I love using back buton focus.
The world is a masterpiece waiting to be captured

#7 richocampo

richocampo

    Super Geek

  • Moderators
  • 232 posts
  • LocationGuam
  • Lenses:Canon 35mm F/2
    Sigma 15-30mm F/3.5
  • Flashes:Yongnuo (2)
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon 50D

Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:34 PM

The older Canon DSLR body/model have this issue of back focusing. 50D is one of them. It's good to see now that newer models (crop sensor) have the back button to help beginners. 


"What I like about black and white photographs is that they're more like reading the book than seeing the movie."

Portfolio | Portraiture , Landscape & Hi-Res Portfolio

#8 Gisele

Gisele

    SDP Team Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • LocationBrooklyn, baby!
  • Lenses:Canon 24-105mm f/4
    Canon 50mm f/1.8
    Canon 50mm f/1.4
    Sigma 10-20mm
    Canon 18-200mm kit lens
    Canon 18-55mm
  • Flashes:none (yet!)
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon 6D and Canon 60D

Posted 10 September 2013 - 05:08 PM

I think I am going to try this tomorrow when my new camera (a Canon 6D) arrives tomorrow. Hoping I can get used to it.



Awards Bar:


#9 Ron Inabinett

Ron Inabinett

    Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Lenses:Canon 70-200 2.8 IS II
    Sigma 35 1.4
  • Flashes:Canon 600ex-rt's and transmitter
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon 5D Mark III

Posted 11 September 2013 - 10:29 PM

Do you have to change back when using a remote shutter release? I like it when hand holding, but it feels awkward on a tripod.



#10 Craig Turner

Craig Turner

    Advanced Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • LocationKalgoorlie
  • Lenses:EF70-300mm F/4.5-5.6 IS USM
    EFS18-55 F/3.5-5.6 IS STM
  • Flashes:Canon 430EX II
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon 70D

Posted 13 September 2013 - 08:55 PM

I have found I need to switch it back for the remote shutter to be able to adjust the focus, that being said if your using a tripod you normally have the image composed and focused to begin with and the remote is so you do not get

camera shake when taking the shot. There is no perfect solution but back af is definately the way to go 90% of the time.


Its not the size of your sensor that counts, it's how you use it ;)     Canon EOS 70D LCD screen

 
 

 

 

 


#11 Randolph

Randolph

    Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • LocationMorecambe Bay Riviera
  • Lenses:EF-S 18-55f 1.3-5.6 IS,
    EF 70-300 f1-4-5.6 IS USM
    SIGMA 10-20 f1-4-5.6 DC HS
    EF 24-105 f4 L IS USM
    EF 20 f2.8 USM
  • Camera Body or Bodies:canon EOS 60D
    Canon EOS 5D Mark 3

Posted 27 November 2013 - 01:19 PM

always use back button focus for all the reasons above plus by also setting the focus and locking the exposure you can then move the camera to a different framing

#12 Jasón Nargiz

Jasón Nargiz

    Post Master

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 74 posts
  • LocationNew Jersey, USA
  • Lenses:M. Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8, 40-150mm f/2.8, 17mm f/1.8, 60mm f/2.8 macro, and 45mm f/1.8; Bower 7.5mm f/3.5; Holga 25mm f/8; Miranda 50mm f/1.8.
  • Flashes:Flashes? We don't need no stinkin' flashes!
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Olympus OM-D E-M5 II, OM-D E-M5, Miranda EE RiC.

Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:03 AM

I have never tried it, but it seems a bit clunky to me. I would have to press the back button then press the shutter button? I'm thinking of fleeting moments when you just have to squeeze the button all the way down so it will focus and instantly take the picture and hope that you get the shot. Nevertheless, I may try it if my camera is capable of it. I've only heard praise for back button focusing.



#13 scarytallman

scarytallman

    Post Master

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 88 posts
  • LocationNorth of Boston, Ma
  • Lenses:Canon EF-S 18-135MM STM
    Canon EF 70-300mm USM IS
    Canon Nifty Fifty F1.8
    Canon 70-200 F2.8L IS II USM
  • Flashes:Yongnuo 568EX II Speedlite
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon 6D
    Canon 70D
    Canon XSI

Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:07 PM

It took me a bit of practice but I know love back button focus. I dont have to worry about grabbing the wrong focus after finally getting there when a cloud goes over the sun and i have to remeter.



#14 jayaram87

jayaram87

    New Member

  • Stunners
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Lenses:sigma 18-35/f-1.8, canon 70-200 F4 IS,canon 50 mm / f-1.8 prime lens , canon 18-200 ef-s lens, Canon 18-55 kit lens
  • Flashes:YN 568 EX MARK II
  • Camera Body or Bodies:EOS 60 D

Posted 07 December 2013 - 06:44 AM

I have set up my EOS 60 D for back button focusing, But , when i half-press the shutter for metering i don't know where the light meter is metering from and i don't see a red focus assist light.

 

i am not sure if not knowing where you are metering from  affects metering in anyway especially when you use spot metering



#15 Randolph

Randolph

    Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • LocationMorecambe Bay Riviera
  • Lenses:EF-S 18-55f 1.3-5.6 IS,
    EF 70-300 f1-4-5.6 IS USM
    SIGMA 10-20 f1-4-5.6 DC HS
    EF 24-105 f4 L IS USM
    EF 20 f2.8 USM
  • Camera Body or Bodies:canon EOS 60D
    Canon EOS 5D Mark 3

Posted 15 December 2013 - 12:37 PM

Jayaram
difficult to answer as it depends how you have set up your back buttons and shutter button. Try a search on goggle with "canon back button focus" and you will find some good advice there on the best way to set it up and to understand the system.

R

#16 Rush2112guy

Rush2112guy

    New Member

  • Stunners
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • LocationIllinois
  • Lenses:Cannon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM ,Tamron 70-200 f2.8 Cannon 85mm f1.8,Cannon EF-S 18-55 IS II kit
  • Flashes:Cannon 430 EX II
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Cannon T3i

Posted 01 January 2014 - 05:22 PM

I set my autofocus to the center metering point only. This way once I back button focus, lock in my exposure with my shutter button, I can then reposition if I need to to use rule of thirds. Seems to be working nicely. Not sure if it will work with continuous shooting though. I am shooting single exposure. Here is a link to help you set it up:

 

http://james-brandon...anon-rebel-t3i/



#17 Justin Eckert

Justin Eckert

    Photo Destroyer

  • Administrators
  • 139 posts
  • LocationMystic, CT
  • Lenses:Pentax PH-RGA 52mm
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Pentax K200D

Posted 23 January 2014 - 07:53 AM

Back-button focus does take some getting used to, but is just a great option for anyone interested in fast-moving, or wildlife photography. I'm glad I've made the switch - I'll never go back to focus-recompose method using the shutter button! 



Awards Bar:


#18 jenstf

jenstf

    Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • LocationNorway
  • Lenses:Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII
    Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG HSM
    Nikon 50mm f/1.8
    Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 G
    Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED (D50 kit
    Nikon 28-80mm (F60 kit)
  • Flashes:Nikon SB-600
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Nikon D7100
    Nikon D50
    Nikon F60

Posted 25 January 2014 - 12:24 PM

Decided to go for back button focusing on my new D7100. Practical to don't have to focus and recompose on every photo and if the subject is moving I just have to hold the back focus button pressed for continious focus to kick in


500px.com     |    iStock     |    Fotolia     |     Dreamstime     |     123RF    |     BigStock     |     CanStock


#19 Alvenmod

Alvenmod

    SDP Team Member

  • Moderators
  • 19 posts
  • LocationStockholm
  • Lenses:Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED AF-S, Nikkor AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR II, Nikkor 300/f4 Af-S, Nikon TC-17EII, Nikon TC-20E III
  • Flashes:Nikon SB-910
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Nikon D800

Posted 25 January 2014 - 05:06 PM

Once you go back focus you never go back (pun intended). Seriously though, it really is much better, you get much more control than having the shutter button doing 2 functions, focus and taking the shot. There are only advantages of using back button focusing and it really is no problem holding as your thumb is right there when holding the camera, it is located in a very good position for your thumb while keeping the index finger on the shutter button.
I am not sure why cameras don't come with this setting default.


*´¨) http://alvenmod.se
¸.·´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)
(¸.·´ (¸.·´ Bazinga!

#20 David X. Li

David X. Li

    Super Geek

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • LocationBoston, MA
  • Lenses:EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
    EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM,
    EF 40mm F/2.8 STM Pancake
  • Flashes:Yongnuo YN-565 EX
  • Camera Body or Bodies:650D

Posted 28 January 2014 - 08:09 AM

I am not sure why cameras don't come with this setting default.

 

Probably because it's too much trouble to teach random people how to use it when you want them to take a picture of you/your family.


  • cberganza likes this

Awards Bar:





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users