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Making Choices


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#1 Kerry Gordon

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 05:25 PM

This is a video from David DuChemin who is becoming one of my favourite photography teachers.  In this short video David talks about a few things that I guess Tony touched on in that piece he did on getting folks to stop asking about EXIF data.  David is touching on some similar material.  One of his points is that when we ask what camera, setting, lens or post processing technique was used, we're asking the wrong questions.  Anyway I recommend taking the ten minutes and giving a listen.

 


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#2 MarkM

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 12:59 AM

Thanks for posting this Kerry. An inspiring reminder to get out and practice this art and craft we enjoy so much, and learn from all our photographic choices, whatever they are.
This forum, as has been said many times, is a safe and welcome place to post the results of our photography choices, and learn from each other.
Thanks.

#3 Roderick

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 08:59 AM

Right on the button, Kerry.

Thanks



#4 PeterPP

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 10:15 AM

I liked David when I attended one of the seminars he gave a few years ago.
Even bought his Visionmongers book. Made it to page 10 or 11 several times now, but keep dozing off :unsure:
One of these days I'll get past the intro and to the good part of the book

(nothing wrong with the book, more an age thing, anytime I sit down to read or watch anything I seem to doze off now)


Peter
 


#5 John W

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 02:28 PM

Good information. TFS



#6 geedee

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 09:38 AM

Interesting topic and I like his presentation style, though still prefer to have settings/lens information for pics posted, it is INFORMATION and as such can be of value to my learning process though perhaps less so if one has subjected the posted image to all sorts of PP procedures after which I suspect some settings may well become irrelevant..

 

Just thinking in type. 



#7 John W

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 10:54 AM

The part about sharing your work, viewing others images and getting feedback hits home for me. It is hard, especially at first, but it is only by sharing your images that you get the feedback from others who know more and or from another set of eyes that are not "color Blind". For example: I captured an image of a Red Fox the other day and was so happy with it that I did not look at my pp objectively. Here is the feedback I got on another site that 20 20 I think was spot on and will be helpful to me going forward. 

 

"A nice sighting, especially when it's not expected. I know you will enjoy the 850, it's a real cracker of a camera body and is a great rival to the D5, and I think better too. Good you kept the SS high which you needed, but for me you needed more DoF ie f/6.3 too, don't be afraid to push the ISO. I like the framing although I can see it with a little less at the foot, or a 16x10 where you loose some of the green above and space below. I like the raised paw and room for him to run into, great to have the face clear of the grasses, nicely timed. Just watch the Black in the legs, it's a fraction choked and some may feel you can reduce the Blue too."

 

[/url]850_2674NIpss by John Whaley, on Flickr">http://27119159839_fcfb47d62d_b.jpg850_2674NIpss by John Whaley, on Flickr



#8 Kerry Gordon

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 11:56 AM

The part about sharing your work, viewing others images and getting feedback hits home for me. It is hard, especially at first, but it is only by sharing your images that you get the feedback from others who know more and or from another set of eyes that are not "color Blind". I captured an image of a Red Fox the other day and was so happy with it that I did not look at my pp objectively. Here is the feedback I got on another site that 20 20 I think was spot on and will be helpful to me going forward. 

 

I have found DuChemin's observations about getting feedback very helpful.  In his book "Soul of the Camera" he also talked about the danger of getting too much feedback.  By that he meant going onto Reddit, Twitter, Instagram and the host of social media sites out there and getting feedback from all sorts of people who have no idea who we are or what we are aspiring to do.  I mean everyone has an opinion  but, in the end, so what.  There is the danger, as well, of our ego drive to accumulate "likes" and the disillusionment that follows  when they are not forthcoming.  The advice I did take from him that has proven to be most valuable was his recommendation to find someone I am connected to who knows me and understands my aesthetic aspirations, my passion and engage them for feedback.  I have a friend who is an artist, though only peripherally a photographer.  But I trust his aesthetic taste and his awareness of my own.  The experience has been fantastic.  He was delighted, even honoured that I would ask him for that favour and has really taken the time to consider my photographs.  His feedback in every case has been so valuable in helping me go deeper into the basic questions around what I am trying to do and the story I'm trying to tell.






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