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Newbie Fisheye Lens Help :d

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#1 Daniel Butler

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 11:33 PM

Hey gang!  Just picked up my Canon 70D and am crazy about it!  I've got all kinds of projects on the horizon, and need some buying advice for a lens.  A friend has asked me to shoot a video project with a lot of close up interaction with the lens (point of view) where I need a wide angle lens that's able to focus extremely close up, especially on the sides of the lens.  From what I've seen, most fisheye lenses don't focus up close, and the edges are blurry.  Is there any exception to this (that's hopefully less than $600?) that anyone can recommend?  I've been looking at the following lenses, but I'm not sure they'll fit what I need:

Samyang 8mm F3.5 Fisheye Lens

Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II Digital Zoom

 

Thanks for any help you can provide!



#2 klaus

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:05 AM

I have the Samyang 8mm and it is mainly for fun. The distortion is extreme and I wouldn't recommend it for ordinary use. By extremely close, do you mean macro close? Then the answer is, well, a macro lens. But ordinary lenses that perform well at the edges are expensive.
Perhaps a workaround? - place yourself farther from your subject if at all possible.

Klaus.
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#3 Bill Peppas

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 09:43 AM

Just get a good ultra-wide angle or just wide angle lens.

Be aware that the ultra-wide ones distort your image considerably especially if you have the camera shifted upwards/downwards.
Since we're talking about video, you should go with a good wide-angle lens ( a 16mm - 18mm ) with a decent close focus distance.

If you'll be shooting outside with the sun in front of you or near your frame avoid the Tokinas as they suffer badly from lens flare + ghosting ( no problem if the sun is behind you or to your sides of course ).



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#4 Daniel Butler

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:21 AM

Thanks guys! Very helpful! Bill, do you have a couple wide angle lenses with close focus distance you could recommend? Looking to stay at or below $600 if possible. Thanks!!

#5 Bill Peppas

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 04:13 AM

Thanks guys! Very helpful! Bill, do you have a couple wide angle lenses with close focus distance you could recommend? Looking to stay at or below $600 if possible. Thanks!!

 

Let me look into it a little bit, because I'm mostly a Nikon guy and I'm not totally aware regarding the solutions available for Canon.
I'll look into it a tad later on once I get done with a client's machine and I'll post asap :)



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#6 Daniel Butler

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:32 PM

Bill, you are amazing!  Seriously, thanks for helping a newbie like me.  :D

 

The one I keep coming back to is the Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 -- the cheaper ones I've looked at (Rokinon) are manual focus, and since it's video, I'm guessing I'll probably want to have a lens that can auto-focus on the fly.  From what I'm reading, the Tokina has a minimum focusing distance of 11.81".  The only one I've found that's better so far is the Canon EF 8-15mm with a 6.2" minimum focusing distance, but it's about 3x as much.  Is there one that's better than the Tokina but less than the Canon that you can think of? 



#7 Bill Peppas

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 07:14 PM

Actually for video manual focus is the preferred method of focusing.
Depending on what you'll be shooting, you might find yourself in the need for a "follow focus" ( focus racking ) "mechanism".

The distortion of the Tokina will most likely annoy you if you'll be shooting indoors or outdoors on heavily "geometrically correct" locations ( architecture, tall buildings, etc ) and the faces of the people will look pretty distorted on the sides and corners of the frame.

 

I'd go for something with less distortion, good image quality, and pretty good close focus, for example the Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM.
Close focus distance 9.44" ( 24cm ), and it also has IS ( Image Stabilization ) which will be helpful in fighting the "rolling shutter" effect if you'll be doing any quick panning.



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