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Pigeon Point, Ca

landscape seascape long exposure

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#1 pthomsen

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 01:58 PM

Noob here at SDP... Been watching Tony and Chelsea for a good while now.

 

I've been looking for a place where I can get real feedback on my photos, so I can learn to get better...

 

These three images were taken at the same spot (Pigeon Point, CA, on the Pacific coast, about 60 miles south of San Francisco), on three separate days.

 

I noticed the light leak streaks in two of the images, and now religiously cap the viewfinder to avoid that.

 

Any other feedback would be greatly appreciated.

 

(Adding settings/filter info):

 

#1 (lighthouse): f/16 24mm 28s ISO100 with 10-stop ND

#2 (coastline): f/16 30mm 136s ISO100 with 10-stop ND

#3 (cove): f/16 22mm 162s ISO100 with 10-stop ND 

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#2 Roderick

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 02:53 PM

Beautiful images.

The first one would also look good in b&w but the you'd loose the warm light coming off the promontory.  I like the light reflection on the lighthouse.  Possibly a re-crop to move the lighthouse to comply with that "rule of thirds" ?

The second one is great.  I thought it was a long exposure of water but it looks like for ?  Either way, a very, very nice photograph.

I love the textures in the sea and sky in no.3.  It looks a little soft on the rocks in the foreground.  The overall scene is great.

Welcome, ;)



#3 MarkM

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 04:19 PM

Beautiful images and welcome!
I like the light on the lighthouse, and contrast to the darker water/shoreline. Sunset?
My fav is #3 due to the clouds. Is it a little out of level, dipping a tad to the right?
What settings, and any filters?

#4 Kerry Gordon

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 04:26 PM

Welcome.  Nice shots all round.  The second one is very well done.  Long exposure?  A little over saturated for my taste but that's just me.  There's something, an object about half way along the point, which I'd remove as it's just enough to be distracting.  Nice composition, very evocative.  The third one is also nice.  I'd consider cropping out maybe, a quarter of the sky as it doesn't add that much.  Also you have some haloing both in the foreground and, more noticeably along the vertical of the furthest point.  I find both the second and third images a bit "muddy" and might want to selectively bring in a bit more clarity and contrast in the darks and midtones.  I hope you find this helpful. 



#5 pthomsen

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 05:25 PM

Beautiful images.

The first one would also look good in b&w but the you'd loose the warm light coming off the promontory.  I like the light reflection on the lighthouse.  Possibly a re-crop to move the lighthouse to comply with that "rule of thirds" ?

The second one is great.  I thought it was a long exposure of water but it looks like for ?  Either way, a very, very nice photograph.

I love the textures in the sea and sky in no.3.  It looks a little soft on the rocks in the foreground.  The overall scene is great.

Welcome, ;)

 

You're right about the first one, rule-of-thirds would be better. I tried cropping it (see below), but re-composing would have been better (I lost the tiny bit of horizon in the crop). I still fall into the trap of just getting trying to get all the technical aspects of the photo right, and then not devoting enough time to the composition and framing.

 

The second one is a long exposure (f/16 136s ISO100). 

 

On the third one, I agree on the softness in the foreground. My lens is not the sharpest, and it's possible that I got a bit of shake in the camera during the exposure (it was a pretty windy day).

 

Thank you for your nice and helpful comments.


Beautiful images and welcome!
I like the light on the lighthouse, and contrast to the darker water/shoreline. Sunset?
My fav is #3 due to the clouds. Is it a little out of level, dipping a tad to the right?
What settings, and any filters?

 

Thanks!

 

#1 is a sunset shot, yes. Probably 15 or so minutes before sunset.

 

And, yes, after re-measuring, #3 is a little off on the leveling. I did level it in Light Room, but must not have paid enough attention. Good catch!

 

I added the settings/filters to the original post.

 

Thanks for your helpful and nice comments.


Welcome.  Nice shots all round.  The second one is very well done.  Long exposure?  A little over saturated for my taste but that's just me.  There's something, an object about half way along the point, which I'd remove as it's just enough to be distracting.  Nice composition, very evocative.  The third one is also nice.  I'd consider cropping out maybe, a quarter of the sky as it doesn't add that much.  Also you have some haloing both in the foreground and, more noticeably along the vertical of the furthest point.  I find both the second and third images a bit "muddy" and might want to selectively bring in a bit more clarity and contrast in the darks and midtones.  I hope you find this helpful. 

 

Thank you! Much appreciated.

 

On #2, I find it hard to control the clarity/saturation/vibrance settings in LightRoom. I stare myself blind on the image, and usually end up with way too much 'pop' when processing. I try to reign myself in, but it's not easy. :-)  

 

Are there rules-of-thumb to avoid going overboard with the saturation?

 

As far as the haloing and vertical lines, I learned my lesson(s) on light leak, and now always put the cap on the viewfinder when doing long exposures.

 

I'll definitely work on losing the muddiness... My lens is not the best, and I think my Light Room skills definitely still need some upgrades.

 

Thank you all for all the great feedback. I've been (and still am) a 500px user, but I never get any constructive feedback there. This is exactly what I was hoping for, as far as improving my skills!

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#6 geedee

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 11:21 PM

Good to have you here on the forum I do like landscape pics and I`m guessing you have already viewed the Lee Filters Youtube vids  given you may be using their Big Stopper, if not, perhaps you might like to beam up their web site, I have the Big and Little stopper which I have not tried out as yet.

 

I suspect you are correct re camera shake in your pics long exposures on a windy day would seem to demand a lot of thought, perhaps standing downwind of your kit during the exposure, hanging some weight off your tripod in a bid to stabilise things... as for stray light, I have seen pro`s in the Lee Filters vids casting a shadow over the filter system to stop light getting into the thin edge of the filter, even seen some covering the rear of the camera to stop light getting into the viewfinder, whereas some cameras have a built in blind mechanism for that.

 

I`m no expert, though your pics are posted with  a file size of circa 100kb which would seem to reduce their quality to some degree I tend to go for circa 800 pixels on the long edge for posting which gives a file size of circa 500-600kb, I think you can post up to 3MB but I have never tried that.

 

Seems to me that you have dived right in to the deep end, and tried to master a whole load of skills in one go,  long exposures in windy conditions and into PP slider confusion.... Less can be more on occasion..?   I have spent some time trying to get it right in-camera first, though have slid every slider every which way and retreated from the confusion I created to try to improve my in-camera practices. I suspect PP is a must to get the best out of the majority of pics..?

 

Another thought re your use of filters..... It seems to me that using filters may be looked upon as a a Pre-Production process in other words you are modifying the scene in-camera prior to pressing the shutter button, I suspect if you THEN apply Post Production processes to the image then I suspect it will be all too easy to entirely confuse yourself....? 

 

Seems Tony reckons that there is NO need for filters in that everything can be replicated in Post Production and with his level of skill I have little doubt HE can...

 

Perhaps try to make things simpler to some extent in terms of long exposures by trying it out on a relatively calm day..? If Landscape is your thing then perhaps try beaming up Thomas Heaton on youtube

 

Hope this helps in some way. 



#7 Roderick

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 02:39 AM

WRT rules of thumb to avoid saturation ?

In her LR and PS videos Chelsea  frequently advises to do all you edits and then ease them back by about 40% ( :rolleyes:)

The general feeling from the Northrups is that saturation tends to be too crude a tool while vibrance and clarity are more subtle.



#8 pthomsen

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 09:56 AM

Good to have you here on the forum I do like landscape pics and I`m guessing you have already viewed the Lee Filters Youtube vids  given you may be using their Big Stopper, if not, perhaps you might like to beam up their web site, I have the Big and Little stopper which I have not tried out as yet.

 

I suspect you are correct re camera shake in your pics long exposures on a windy day would seem to demand a lot of thought, perhaps standing downwind of your kit during the exposure, hanging some weight off your tripod in a bid to stabilise things... as for stray light, I have seen pro`s in the Lee Filters vids casting a shadow over the filter system to stop light getting into the thin edge of the filter, even seen some covering the rear of the camera to stop light getting into the viewfinder, whereas some cameras have a built in blind mechanism for that.

 

I`m no expert, though your pics are posted with  a file size of circa 100kb which would seem to reduce their quality to some degree I tend to go for circa 800 pixels on the long edge for posting which gives a file size of circa 500-600kb, I think you can post up to 3MB but I have never tried that.

 

Seems to me that you have dived right in to the deep end, and tried to master a whole load of skills in one go,  long exposures in windy conditions and into PP slider confusion.... Less can be more on occasion..?   I have spent some time trying to get it right in-camera first, though have slid every slider every which way and retreated from the confusion I created to try to improve my in-camera practices. I suspect PP is a must to get the best out of the majority of pics..?

 

Another thought re your use of filters..... It seems to me that using filters may be looked upon as a a Pre-Production process in other words you are modifying the scene in-camera prior to pressing the shutter button, I suspect if you THEN apply Post Production processes to the image then I suspect it will be all too easy to entirely confuse yourself....? 

 

Seems Tony reckons that there is NO need for filters in that everything can be replicated in Post Production and with his level of skill I have little doubt HE can...

 

Perhaps try to make things simpler to some extent in terms of long exposures by trying it out on a relatively calm day..? If Landscape is your thing then perhaps try beaming up Thomas Heaton on youtube

 

Hope this helps in some way. 

 

Thanks for all your thoughtful comments. This is why I joined SDPCommunity: so I could get feedback and help to become a better photographer!

 

I haven't watched the Lee Filters videos, but have watched many others (including the fantastic Thomas Heaton), both for inspiration and to learn some of the technical aspects of photography. In addition to Heaton, I also watch Ben Fewtrell, Joshua Cripps, Ben Horne, and of course the Northrups.

 

BTW, I use 'ICE' ND filters. They are a lot cheaper than the Lee ones (USD50 for my 10-stopper). They work pretty well for me, after I figured out how to remove the blue cast in post. Anyone here have experience with them?

 

About the light leaks, I have definitely learned my lesson. I cap the viewfinder, and if there is any chance of light leaking in through the filter holder, I block it with my hand or body.

 

I honestly don't think that Long Exposure photography is that complicated to pull off. There are definitely more steps, but it is not as fiddly as it might seem. As for how it affects my work flow, the filter definitely adds a few steps in Post (mainly changing the white balance and possibly stacking a second exposure to remove things that moved during the exposure), but again, I don't think it's overwhelming or confusing. One step at a time, and it gets done.

 

Regarding trying on a calm day, as far as learning goes, I agree. Remove anything that can complicate the process while you're learning. BUT... if there is a good shot to be had on a windy day, I will definitely go for it :-)  

 

The advice about weighing down the tripod in windy conditions is a good one. I will try that.







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