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Nikkor 70-200 F4 (Vs. F 2.8)


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#1 MarkM

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 11:37 AM

Does anyone shoot with the 70-200 f4?

 

I have been looking to buy the 70-200 f2.8.  However, the 70-200 f4 at lower cost and lower weight is starting to look like a nice option. 

 

Some YouTubers say that with today's modern cameras and low ISO settings, there is less need for that wider 2.8 aperture and the f4 is fine.  The bokeh is better with 2.8 though.

 

One YouTube photographer said the f4 goes all the way down to f32 (vs. the f22 limit on the 2.8 lens), although I'm not really clear on that advantage. 

 

A couple YouTube reviews suggest the f 2.8 is for "pros" who can't afford to give up a shot with that extra stop (like weddings or indoor sports scenes), while the f4 would be a better value for hobbyists like myself.

 

I like landscape photography a lot and mostly shoot that.  However, I also like macro, and with a longer lens (and a teleconverter) would like to try some bird photography.  I also would like the ability to do some outdoor sports and local airshows.  Maybe someday I'll get courageous and even get into portraits.  The 70-200 seems like a great versatile lens for someone like myself who is just starting and exploring everything.  The only question remaining for me is f/2.8 vs f/4

 

Any thoughts on the f/4 in comparison with the 2.8 which I know many of you have and enjoy?

 

Thanks!



#2 geedee

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 01:12 PM

Mark, I have the Nikkor f2.8 and x2 converter and at 400mm  It`s max aperture is reduced to f5.6 and I found 400mm and f5.6 limiting for distant subjects. The Nikkor has f5.6 all through it`s range from 140-400mm with the converter attached.

 

The Tamron 150-600 was my choice in the hope of photographing birds though the Tamron is a variable aperture f5.6 - 6.3 lens being 5.6 at 150mm through to circa 220mm where it then reduces to f5.3,  and at circa 240mm max is f5.6  and at circa 340 max is f6 and by 450 down to f6.3..

 

From a poor memory the weight of the Tamron 150-600 is VERY similar to the Nikkor 70-200 f2.8 + converter attached.

 

Hope I have not further muddied the water.. 



#3 elcab18

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 01:42 PM

Hey Mark, choosing the f4 you give up the speed, with or without using a teleconverter, and a few elements of glass, the good news is that with either one, you get the nano coating and VR.  You get a great lens either way...but... if you think there will be situations where you wish you could get a more extreme bokeh in a background that is fairly close to your subject...then you'll wish you had the 2.8

 

Can't think of anything else :)



#4 MarkM

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 09:53 AM

Thanks Geedee and Doug.  Its a tough choice!  On the one hand I think the f/4 would work just fine for landscape photography.  On the other hand I think about the lens as an investment and "future proofing" my kit for other kinds of photography and the versatility the f/2.8 provides! 

 

I'll stew on it further


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#5 John W

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 12:53 PM

"A couple YouTube reviews suggest the f 2.8 is for "pros" who can't afford to give up a shot with that extra stop (like weddings or indoor sports scenes), while the f4 would be a better value for hobbyists like myself." This would be my take plus wildlife in low light and or to isolate the subject and blow the background. For landscape I don't see the advantage. You are most likely using a tripod and shooting f11+ not f2.8. 



#6 rospondek

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 05:13 PM

As a proud and freakin' happy owner of 2.8 I can say that:

  1. 2.8 is much heavier and bigger than 4. This can be an issue on longer trips.
  2. 2.8 is sharper than 4. It is obvious, and you can't argue with that. When you don't shoot wide open (f/2.8) you will have sharper image at f/4 than on native f/4 lens which at this aperture will be wide open. I guess I didn't messed this up :D
  3. for the price of one 2.8 you can have two 4 ;)
  4. Sometimes those few extra stops at 2.8, even not razor sharp (but they are...), are the matter of I've got photo and I've got nothing.
  5. Difference between f/22 and f/32 for me is as well questionable. It has to be really bright to have problems with f/22 to be too wide. So doesn't matter for me. Such a high values are important with macro photo.

I guess that's all from me. But I'm no expert so only my feelings :)


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#7 geedee

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 03:21 AM

Thinking of lugging the lens across hills an glens and that for landscape circa f11 and a tripod may be in use, I can see why a well skilled landscape photographer might choose the lighter (Cannon) lens and has great success with it, however it seems his well thought out decisions were based on a VERY specific set of circumstances.... whereas most folk want something that does everything and with an eye on minimal/reasonable cost...(-:  I suspect the ability to determine one`s own real priorities might be more difficult than we might imagine... Me..?  I`m a self confessed gear junkie.  



#8 MarkM

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 12:08 AM

Thanks Jonny (and Geedee) for your thoughts.

And thanks everyone for your comments. I'll eventually figure out what works for me.

#9 Armitage

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 07:24 AM

My 70-200mm 2.8 is world class... but it's heavy enough to tire me after a trip to the zoo.






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