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Iss With Astrotrac - One 300S Frame


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#1 rospondek

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 05:13 PM

Finally I made it to catch something after sunset.

 

Weather is great, sky clear - at least as clear as it can be in the middle of the city - and I have enough time to set the equipment right.

 

So below you can see one single frame. No stacking.

 

Settings:

Body: D500

Lens: Nikkor 10-24mm at 14mm

Aperture: f/4

ISO: 100

Exposition: 300s

Tracking: Astrotrac

Target: East ISS fly-through

 

zarya_201705282320_1080p.jpg

 

Enjoy :)

 

If you want the original version - Here it is



#2 Reciprocityrules

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 10:05 PM

Very cool pics, and that's a pretty cool contraption; Astrotrac.  I think you would need a quicker shutter speed to freeze the action  B).  It looks like you can capture some amazing stuff with an Astrotrac.  What's your impression of it?


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#3 Roderick

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 03:01 AM

Great picture !



#4 rospondek

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 10:05 AM

It was fun :)

I'm shocked that 5 minutes didn't overexposed it.

 

Astrotrac is amazing for amateur astrophotography. You can't attach to it a telescope cause it has maximum weight of around 2kg of equipment. So even my D500 with 70-200 is on the limit.

The good thing is that all of the equipment is attached in one axis with the tripod (and the equatorial wedge) and the engine itself is on the other side of this contraption so there is actually no worry that something will break.

 

The accuracy is really good. My missed stars are my fault (and the flaw of the lens), a little more in a second, and as I read bout it it can track stars without problems for up to 10 minutes on 200mm lens. After that there are a little problems and misalignment. But it is normal and nothing to worry. It is just for fun, not astronomical science. It is unusual to take photos longer than 5 minutes. You can check some Andromeda stacks. They are usually 300s frames stacked. Dozens of them but at the most 300s.

 

As for the missing stars. This is the real problem and the worst thing but this is just normal with manual things. It has to be perfectly aligned and this is really hard to do. I'm not talking bout setting up the Polaris. That's just piece of cake. The problem is with setting up the polaroscope and it's holder to be in the point blank center all the time, despite it's location. Hard to explain in a few words, or paragraphs but it has to be set by hand millimeter after millimeter. So a little change, verify, change, verify and so on and so on.

Looks like mine is set ok, I just missed the Polaris a little and a level of tripod (I set up in barely 15 minutes with all the equipment :D) but looks like it is doing pretty well.

Maybe today I'll try with 200mm, but I don't know what would be the target, cause Andromeda unfortunately is on the wrong side of the sky for me. Behind the huge street lamp...

 

So yes. I'm happy with it especially that it is impossible for me to have a real telescope with EQ5 or EQ6... As I said previous. Not the price, lack of space..


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#5 rospondek

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 05:00 AM

Another fly over. This time 1.5h earlier, that's why the sunset colors at the bottom.

 

Settings:

Body: D500

Lens: Nikkor 10-24mm at 10mm

Aperture: f/5,6

ISO: 100

Exposition: 300s

Tracking: Astrotrac

Target: East ISS fly-through

540786_dsc6859.jpg



#6 MarkM

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 10:31 AM

I like this second one a lot. The colors, the ISS tracking line, and the star field all are beautiful.

#7 Reciprocityrules

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 10:50 AM

FWIW - I like the second one better too.  The sunset colors at the bottom, and the lighter background with the gradient effect on the blue - very cool!  I know you can't see as many stars, but the image is just wonderful - the colors are awesome. 


Jonny


#8 Jos Bennenbroek

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 12:42 AM

Great shots! From what I understand, the ISS zooms by in a split second.



#9 rospondek

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 03:45 AM

Thanks guys. Colors adds charm to whole picture.

Today I also tried to catch one but this time it was even before sunset so - Where is Waldo?

 

Settings:

Body: D500

Lens: Nikkor 10-24mm at 10mm

Aperture: f/5,6

ISO: 50

Exposition: 15s

Tracking: Astrotrac - set to void :D

Target: East ISS fly-through

577983_dsc6894.jpg

 

Jos it is not split of second. This first fly over (from the first post) lasts from 23:04:30-23:06:00 so it is rather a long pass. That's why longer exposures are needed for a not interrupted line.

 

Here's what you will get with 30s exposures with 1s pause for 41 minutes without tracking.

a3690cb6a4c8a5613278d7d0_rw_1920.jpg

Highest speed ISS can get on the sky. Straight above. That's why the gap is so huge.

 

Or for 100 minutes. Slower speed, as it goes towards horizon, and shorter gap.

Dotted lines are planes, if you wondered :)

25f6f0b078efec2f7bae69ca_rw_1920.jpg

 

Unfortunately 300mm (200mm DX) is not enough to get the details of ISS with high speed photo (base settings - 1/1600, f/8, ISO 2500). You need at least 600mm and a telescope actually.





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