Jump to content


Photo

Dumb Question

L Bracket

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 geedee

geedee

    Dedicated SDP Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,063 posts
  • Lenses:Nikon 16-35 VR f4 50mm f1.4 70-200 VR II f2.8 x2 converter
    18-70 f3.5-4.5DX (kit for D70s)
    Tamron 150-600 f5-6.3
    Cannon 50mm f1.8
  • Flashes:Nikon SB 910
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Cannon AE1
    Nikon D70S D800

Posted 24 May 2017 - 01:59 PM

OK, OK, I can`t hold out any longer..... Can somebody tell me, what is the advantage of an L bracket...?   Given it is designed purely for tripod use (?)  and almost every tripod known to man has an option to hold a camera in landscape, portrait and anywhere in between, I am at a loss to imagine the benefit of spending £100+ or $200+ on such a device unless it is required in very specialist circumstances, and even then..???

 

I admit to portraying an element of  gear junkie tendencies, but I am struggling with this one....(-:



#2 MarkM

MarkM

    Super Geek

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts
  • LocationOrange County, California
  • Lenses:AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR
    AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Nikon D750
    Sony RX100 M4

Posted 24 May 2017 - 03:06 PM

Geedee, maybe I'm wasting money I don't know. Maybe it's a luxury, But I want one
If I compose the scene in landscape orientation and swivel down to portrait I have to recompose. And some tripods aren't absolutely secure depending on weight of camera/lens so sagging can occur (vs being centered on top of tripod)
L-bracket keeps the portrait-oriented kit balanced and centered without a lot of recomposing.
My 2 cents

#3 geedee

geedee

    Dedicated SDP Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,063 posts
  • Lenses:Nikon 16-35 VR f4 50mm f1.4 70-200 VR II f2.8 x2 converter
    18-70 f3.5-4.5DX (kit for D70s)
    Tamron 150-600 f5-6.3
    Cannon 50mm f1.8
  • Flashes:Nikon SB 910
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Cannon AE1
    Nikon D70S D800

Posted 24 May 2017 - 05:43 PM

Mark, my question was not meant as a criticism of L Brackets, just that I do not understand what their advantage was given it seems recomposing seems likely when changing between landscape and portrait...Thus I thought there may be something I was missing...?  As a self confessed gear junkie I would have a hard time criticising the choices of others and trying to  justify the cost of the kit I have, given the poor quality  of my pics.... but I enjoy the process.... most of the time...(-:



#4 MarkM

MarkM

    Super Geek

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts
  • LocationOrange County, California
  • Lenses:AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR
    AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E ED VR
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Nikon D750
    Sony RX100 M4

Posted 25 May 2017 - 12:42 AM

No problem Geedee. There are some YouYube videos about them. Here's one:
https://youtu.be/zbjDO0iNGL0

#5 Happy Grumpz

Happy Grumpz

    Master Photographer

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,360 posts
  • LocationNewcastle upon Tyne, UK
  • Lenses:...
    Canon EF 17-40mm f/4 L
    Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L
    Canon EF 100 f/2.8 IS L
    Canon EF 100-400 IS USM
    Canon EF 400mm f/2.8 IS L
    Canon EFS 50mm f/1.8 II
    Canon EF 1.4X III Extender
  • Flashes:...
    Yongnuo YN-600EX RT
    Yongnuo YN-E3-RT
  • Camera Body or Bodies:...
    Canon 5D MkIII
    Canon 7D MkII

Posted 25 May 2017 - 03:38 AM

Geedee, I have one on my 5Dmk3.

 

The main advantage for me is that camera and a 17-40 along with a load of lee filters is a pretty heavy combination. I hated the camera hanging off the side of the ball head while in portrait, it's just never seemed stable.

 

With the L bracket, the weight is right in the centre and it's much easier (IMO) to do pano's while in portrait orientation.

 

Plus you don't need to spend stupid money on one. I paid £25 for mine and it's a solid bit of kit.


My flickr Page

#6 RAH1861

RAH1861

    <3 SDP

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 572 posts
  • LocationHampton, NH
  • Lenses:Sigma 17-50mm f2.8; Canon 60mm macro; Canon 400mm f5.6L; Canon 10-18mm; Canon 24mm pancake; Canon 55-250; Tamron 70-300; Sigma 18-250; Samyang Fisheye; Samyang 16mm; Samyang 35mm; Tokina 12-24mm
  • Flashes:YongNuo YN-468 II
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Canon 80D; Canon 60D; Canon SL1; Olympus E-M10; Panasonic GM5; Panasonic Lumix LX5

Posted 25 May 2017 - 05:44 AM

I use an L-bracket mainly for doing horizontal panos (portrait orientation for maximum height, panning horizontally). Even if you are not going to bother with the "nodal" point and all that (I do not bother with it), you really should at least try to pivot the camera on a central point - i.e. on the center of the tripod's center column. Flopping the camera over to the side for vertical orientation (as you would do without an L-bracket) means you are NOT pivoting in the center - you are skewed off center and not pivoting on a central point.
 
If I were just using an L-bracket for switching between portrait and landscape mode, I think I would probably not bother with it, but for panos I think it is essential.

Rich


#7 geedee

geedee

    Dedicated SDP Member

  • Stunners
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,063 posts
  • Lenses:Nikon 16-35 VR f4 50mm f1.4 70-200 VR II f2.8 x2 converter
    18-70 f3.5-4.5DX (kit for D70s)
    Tamron 150-600 f5-6.3
    Cannon 50mm f1.8
  • Flashes:Nikon SB 910
  • Camera Body or Bodies:Cannon AE1
    Nikon D70S D800

Posted 25 May 2017 - 06:10 AM

THANKS guys... Mark, yeah I should have beamed up Youtube... though the vids I scanned did not raise the advantages raised by Matt and Rah....

 

Matt your point on stability improvement over ball head in portrait seems entirely logical, and not one I had contemplated. Similarly the info on pano`s that both you and Rah raised, not having attempted pano`s in other than landscape, the issue never crossed my radar..


  • Happy Grumpz likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users