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Why Printing Your Images Is A Good Thing...


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#1 David Pavlich

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 10:53 PM

First, there is no comparison to seeing your favorite shot(s) in a 16X20 frame to what you see on a monitor.  It's just not the same. 

 

Second, when you have your image on display, it creates conversation.  I guarantee that if you have a neat shot in your living room or dining room, most people will comment.

 

In my case, I sell my prints.  And this doesn't mean you have to be a home printer like me.  If I want to print larger than 17" wide, I have to go to a lab since that's all the larger my printer will go.

 

I belong to an art club that has a meeting once a month.  Many of the members bring their art to the meetings for a little in club art show.  I was artist of the month with a B&W of the puppet street performers in the French Quarter.  The artist of the month gets to have their piece displayed at a local hospital lobby.  Well, I got an email yesterday telling me that one of the hospital administrators wants me to make a print for her home. 

 

And, I donated a print of a hummingbird to a local tennis tournament charity event for their silent auction.  It did well there, but, again, someone that saw it contacted me to make them a print for their home.

 

So...if you don't think that your stuff is good enough to print, think again.  My stuff is nothing spectacular, but it appeals to the average person out there.  It's like the HDR stuff that sells so well.  Certainly, purists and pixel peepers would never hang those shots in their homes, yet the average person likes them because they're different.

 

Don't be afraid to print your work.  If nothing else, reward yourself for your time and effort.  You'll be glad you did!!

 

David


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'When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane, you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash.'

 


#2 Reciprocityrules

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 05:08 AM

Congratulations on your accomplishments David!  The last bit I read was about you winning the artist of the month, and it seems like you're moving right along; very cool.  As we read the posts about cell phones replacing proper cameras, perhaps prints, actual physical prints, are a way to keep things alive.  Your point about the general public strikes me.  When they see things that are new to them, they may be motivated to purchase.  It's relatively unique and not mass-marketed, so there is vale in for them.  Until I got involved in photography, I never looked at photo sites and didn't know you could order prints from sites; where does a person outside the photo community learn this or is it reasonable to assume they would even research it?  I know there are digital photo frames that people may use, but I've never bought one because it's not real to me.  A year-and-a-half ago, I'd just go to local art galleries to find things to hang on the wall, and I bet a lot of folks are the same.  You're moving outside what may be a digital bubble/vacuum that some may be trapped in; marketing most heavily to members of the photographic community.  Kudos to you, and thanks for the motivation! 


Jonny


#3 David Pavlich

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 07:49 AM

Really, though, think about what we do.  IT'S FUN!!!!  I enjoy the whole thing; shooting, processing, printing, and manufacturing my own frames (I like the smell of sawdust :-) ).  I just made up three frames yesterday and there's nothing like the high pitched whine of a trim router at 16,000 rpm removing a bit of wood to make things look better.  A little touch up with an orbital sander, a bit of stain, and there it is.

 

I know it's not for everyone, but even if you don't go to the extent that I do, when you find a shot that just makes you smile at what you've captured, send the file to Meridian or Bayphoto and have a print made.  You'll be very glad you did!

 

David


'When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane, you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash.'

 


#4 geedee

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Posted 15 April 2017 - 07:08 AM

David, many thanks for providing an insight to your enjoyment of so many aspects of photography and your suggestions so related.



#5 David Pavlich

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 01:15 PM

It is fun!  I barely make enough from it to keep me in ink, paper, and wood, but maybe someday after I assume room temperature, my photos will become famous...yea, right!  :-)  

 

David


'When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane, you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash.'

 





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