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Red Corn Poppies


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#1 Jaime Rodriguez

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 10:17 PM

Went to the Wild Seed Farm here in Texas Saturday, and thought I had a decent shot until I got home and everything looked completely saturated any help would be greatly appreciated : )

 

ISO 100

38mm

f/5.0

1/500 sec

No Post Processing

 

uploaded  2nd photo and pulled red back some, not as sharp as i like but will work on others!

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#2 Roderick

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 02:35 AM

Very "Impressionistic" !  Its a beautiful scene.

If you shot it in RAW you might be able to reduce the Red saturation slider a bit.

I'm looking for a focus point and it appears to be on the fence in the distance so at f5 the flowers are out of focus.

maybe a slower shutter 1/50th or there abouts and a narrower aperture to get a higher depth of field ?

 

Or, you could go the other way with the photo and blur it, texture it and clone out the fences and buildings (and that bottom right corner ;)), and make it super-arty ?



#3 geedee

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 03:14 AM

How could anyone pass such a sight and not be tempted to capture it...Beautiful     My eyesight is definitely suspect though I could find nothing sharp in your image and there is so much that is unnatural in the background to detract from the impact of the blooms.... Perhaps if you had got in reasonably close to get a really sharp focus on a few blooms and created a DOF that  filled the frame with a red/green bokeh....?  Yup all to easy to criticise, I too have come across a field of blooms though in mine the background architecture was a tad more interesting and I still failed to capture anything worth while.. still I enjoy trying though  (-:



#4 elcab18

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 07:41 PM

Really like the second one Jaime, I agree that not much is in focus, looks to me that the most focused is near the center of the shot.  Having said that, a shot like this doesn't need much in focus, if anything...the foreground should be in focus as best as possible, use manual focus for sure and get the foreground crisp.  It's always windy out here in our wildflower fields which are mostly in desert areas and foothills, a color blur works just fine for me if there is enough color.  If there isn't enough color then give yourself some space so the green stems aren't prominent, just my humble opinion ;) .

Nice work! 



#5 Jaime Rodriguez

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 10:31 PM

Really like the second one Jaime, I agree that not much is in focus, looks to me that the most focused is near the center of the shot.  Having said that, a shot like this doesn't need much in focus, if anything...the foreground should be in focus as best as possible, use manual focus for sure and get the foreground crisp.  It's always windy out here in our wildflower fields which are mostly in desert areas and foothills, a color blur works just fine for me if there is enough color.  If there isn't enough color then give yourself some space so the green stems aren't prominent, just my humble opinion ;) .

Nice work! 

So being that it's always windy, what is a good shutters speed to compensate for the wind, is 1/500 to slow?



#6 Roderick

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 05:16 AM

That second photo is beautiful.

The way the red of the poppies grades and merges as you look further into the picture is very very nice.

Great pic



#7 geedee

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 09:33 AM

The second pic works better for me too, very nice indeed..  If you opened the lens up wide and focussed perhaps 5 ft into the scene that may just enable you to up the speed and reduce blur caused by  wind....? However if whatever speed you can get to does not give you a reasonably sharp in focus bloom due to the effect of the wind, you might have to get up earlier in the morning when it might not be quite as windy...?



#8 elcab18

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 11:03 AM

So being that it's always windy, what is a good shutters speed to compensate for the wind, is 1/500 to slow?

Was there wind when you took the shots?  If not you just miss focused or the 1/500 was too slow, if it was windy and if you used auto focus the camera may not have been able to focus precisely.  I would manually focus on an area in the foreground, the flowers in the background are too small and far away to expect them to be in focus no matter what.  You have a few option with a shot like this, a crisp foreground fading to a nice blurry bokeh (maybe f 4, 1/1000) or a nice blur all the way through (f 16, 1/30) something like that, both outcomes may yield a nice artsy affect.  I would even try auto iso, one less thing to worry about, there's plenty of light that high iso shouldn't be a factor (so many of the people I've went on excursions with through the years automatically revert to iso 100 for every landscape shot outside).  Stand on the roof of your for a different perspective.  Know your camera through and through (certainly not saying you don't already) you can shoot the scene at 10 or 15 setting combinations in a minute or two all with slightly different outcomes!



#9 Jaime Rodriguez

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 11:26 AM

Was there wind when you took the shots?  If not you just miss focused or the 1/500 was too slow, if it was windy and if you used auto focus the camera may not have been able to focus precisely.  I would manually focus on an area in the foreground, the flowers in the background are too small and far away to expect them to be in focus no matter what.  You have a few option with a shot like this, a crisp foreground fading to a nice blurry bokeh (maybe f 4, 1/1000) or a nice blur all the way through (f 16, 1/30) something like that, both outcomes may yield a nice artsy affect.  I would even try auto iso, one less thing to worry about, there's plenty of light that high iso shouldn't be a factor (so many of the people I've went on excursions with through the years automatically revert to iso 100 for every landscape shot outside).  Stand on the roof of your for a different perspective.  Know your camera through and through (certainly not saying you don't already) you can shoot the scene at 10 or 15 setting combinations in a minute or two all with slightly different outcomes!

Thanks for your advice, it was really windy that day, I tend to always keep at ISO 100 on most landscape shots outside as well, I watched the flowers swaying back and forth and assumed a shutter speed of 1/500 would be sufficient.


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#10 elcab18

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 09:34 AM

Hi Jaime, this is one I took a couple years ago, you can see nothing is really in sharp focus, the wind was howling to the point I couldn't even keep the camera still, but somehow it still works.

 

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#11 Jaime Rodriguez

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Posted 13 April 2017 - 11:31 PM

Hi Jaime, this is one I took a couple years ago, you can see nothing is really in sharp focus, the wind was howling to the point I couldn't even keep the camera still, but somehow it still works.

Beautiful Picture!!!



#12 rospondek

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Posted 14 April 2017 - 10:23 AM

Red Poppies have a very sad tradition and history in Poland. For us any red field of poppies is like photo of Normandy's cemetery for Americans, British, Canadians and all other nations who lost their soldiers in there. Reminds us of one of the bloodiest yet won battles.

A short quote from one of our wartime songs.

Red poppies on Monte Cassino
Instead of dew, drank Polish blood.
As the soldier crushed them in falling,
For the anger was more potent than death.
Years will pass and ages will roll,
But traces of bygone days will stay,
And the poppies on Monte Cassino
Will be redder having quaffed Polish blood.

 
That's why for me those are very sad photos but beautiful as well :)

Thanks for that.

 

And sorry for this serious post.






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