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How To Preserve Family History Pictures?

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#1 dpsdaveservice

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 03:10 AM

I came here to ask some help and to help some ides regarding photography but in my case i have a huge collection of pictures from our ancestors that we have been collected from 100 years and some are already blurred but I want to preserve this family history for our grandchildren in future.

 

Is there any remedy where we can preserve this thousands of pictures?



#2 geedee

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 03:28 AM

Been there done that...(-:  I used a flatbed scanner to convert the pictures into digital format from there you can then repair the flaws and make whatever adjustments you think necessary. For me the big advantage was in being able to create a file system that made any one image so much easier to find as opposed to hunting through boxes.  The other benefit is the ability to create slide shows etc. etc. etc. Good luck with your project.



#3 rospondek

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 03:56 AM

And after cleaning them digitally print the most valuable ones. It's worth the money cause paper lasts literally thousands of years if kept well, photo paper, not so long but as in your case over 100 years is already much longer than any HDD, flash drive or DVD.

 

My grandparents got photos from about 1900 which are not in mint condition (they survived two world wars in Poland stored in strange places so...) but even so they looks amazing after around 120 years ^_^



#4 Roderick

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 11:22 AM

On the same subject, is there a way to un-attach a framed photograph that has become stuck to the inside if the glass ?

Steam ?



#5 rospondek

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 01:53 PM

Ouch, know what you talk about and I think it is a hit or miss situation. I've found one explanation on Smithonian Institute archives. And the other somewhere else.
 
I myself tried with one photo. I'm rather patient person so it took me a few hours trying to remove 1mm after another but still it was a mess. No matter what I tried. Even with moisturizing part of the photo (it was the one to test, some landscape, before the actual one). All I can say the other photos stayed behind the glass.

I don't know, maybe my photos were really glued to the glass. But the truth is photo will act different depends on the chemicals used to make it. My mother have a few of photos made by herself by hand in the home darkroom. They looks a way different than the ones make by the so called 'professionals on the street' at the same time :) Contrast, quality, preservation, facture. Just by the feel you know which one was a production and which a home job.






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