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White Balance For Landscapes...


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#1 aggiecutter

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 08:30 PM

Is it necessary to use a custom white balance in camera, or shoot a picture of a white balance card in the lighting you are taking your photos in(then apply in post) for landscape photography. Or, can proper white balance be attained in post without a custom white balance or white balance card as a reference for your photos.



#2 MarkM

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:07 PM

I've learned you can adjust it in post. On the other hand you can do the best you can in-camera and save time for other production editing.
I'm still learning. So I'm trying to get it "right" in camera.

#3 elcab18

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:30 PM

IMHO white balance is probably the most important adjustment you can make to bring out true life to you photos.  I let the the gear make the initial decision by setting it to auto, then keep a mental snapshot, and then carefully adjust in post.  You will know when it's right!  Cameras can be fooled, the basic exposure setting is a prime example.

Doug



#4 JestePhotography

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:53 PM

Shoot raw fix your WB to where it needs to go in post.

#5 rospondek

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:11 AM

IMHO white balance is probably the most important adjustment you can make to bring out true life to you photos.

Totally agree but...

 

I let the the gear make the initial decision by setting it to auto, then keep a mental snapshot, and then carefully adjust in post. You will know when it's right! Cameras can be fooled, the basic exposure setting is a prime example.
Doug

The auto WB is ok when you're about to make 5-10 photos. When this number has one more '0' or even two spread across different locations... Believe me, anything set to auto will make you mental after 200th photo with different settings each time.

So, unless you have a lot of time, you will prepare to make this couple of shots and want to shoot JPG and get WYSIWYG straight from the camera don't bother with anything 'auto'.
But that's my workflow :)



#6 Meergrapher

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:06 AM

.



#7 geedee

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:48 AM

Bryan Peterson is one of the "expert" who`s books I bought after liking the many vids he made for Adorama suggests that he sets his camera to cloudy and leaves it there. I guess he perhaps has set that as a datum and adjusts in PP from that point....?

 

I have enjoyed capturing a few landscape pics amongst other subjects though as yet have not got round to studying other than the very basics of PP and having seen just some of the possibilities PP can add or detract from an image, it seems that to try to judge what might have been captured in-camera relative to the final image after PP has been applied must be close to impossible... As for the importance of selecting a perfect white balance setting for a particular scene when intending to apply PP to the captured image....????? 

 

Try beaming up www.landscapepro.pics  and have a look at the magic that can be PP.... seems getting it entirely wrong in camera may be no big deal....Which can indeed be a great comfort at times for me, though it seems camera skills like many others can be negated to a certain extent by modern methods...?

 

Yeah... just showing my age...(-: 



#8 David Pavlich

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 08:42 AM

The best advice I've read;  shoot in RAW.  You have total control over the white balance in post.

 

David


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#9 JestePhotography

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 11:48 AM

Tip 2? Develop in black n white? 😈
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#10 elcab18

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 06:57 PM

Agree, RAW



#11 Mark Monson

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 09:29 AM

If you don't already shoot landscapes in full manual and plan to take multiple shots to stitch them into a pano, take a sample (perhaps the middle picture) to see what the settings should be for the proper exposure. Then set your camera to full manual, dial in those settings and take your shots. If you let the camera decide the settings for each shot, chances are something will change in some of them. This way, you only need to adjust one in post and sync those settings to the others. Your stitched pano should look great.

And yes, always shoot raw if you don't mind doing some post processing; then white balance setting is a non-issue.
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#12 TknoGeek

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 09:32 PM

Is it necessary to use a custom white balance in camera, or shoot a picture of a white balance card in the lighting you are taking your photos in(then apply in post) for landscape photography. Or, can proper white balance be attained in post without a custom white balance or white balance card as a reference for your photos.

1. No, it is not necessary to use a custom white balance for landscapes. I very rarely change my white balance setting in camera, but see #2...

 

2. Yes, it is a good idea to take a photo of a gray card. As you know, even sunlight changes over the course of a day (or even with the moving of a cloud), so taking a reference shot of a gray card allows accurate reproduction in post - or at least let you know by how much you're intentionally moving away from accurate.  ;)  When looking at an import of mine from a week's travel, one can easily identify the different locations by gray card photos in the collection.

 

3. Yes, "proper" white balance can be attained in post - particularly if you shoot in raw format. For landscapes perhaps more than any other photographic genre, raw is practically a requirement.



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#13 Kerry Gordon

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 10:31 AM

I find getting the right white balance to be very challenging.  I shoot in RAW so I don't do it in camera.  And, of course, I'm a relative beginner.  But it really is less about technically getting it right than it is about training my eye.  I've shot and post processed a lot over the past six or eight months.  I'll work on a photo and then be really excited about it and show it to anyone who will look.  Then I'll come back to it maybe a month later and be shocked - "What was I thinking?!" The photo will be obviously brown and muddy or have a blue cast or some such thing that I just wasn't able to see.  As I say, there are ways you can set white balance both in Lr and Ps that is supposedly "technically right" but in the end what it's about for me is training my eye and learning to trust it.






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