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Perseid Meteor Shower Night Of Aug 11-12

perseid meteor shower

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#1 PeterPP

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 08:39 AM

If you are up for trying some meteor shots, the annual perseid meteor shower should peak the night of August 11-12, 

Best viewing is after the moon sets in the pre-dawn hours.

 

http://earthsky.org/...d-meteor-shower

 

And of course where I am we are expecting rain (90% in the forecast) for that time.  :(


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#2 TrailEx

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 04:36 PM

Does anyone have any tips or suggestions for the best ways to photograph meteor showers? I've done star trails, but I've never shot a meteor shower before.



#3 Bill Peppas

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 06:34 PM

The same principles apply to meteor showers.
 

For example the basic tips

 

http://www.skyandtel...-meteor-shower/

 

And more tricks:

 

http://www.clarkvisi...-b1200vc2s.html



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#4 David Pavlich

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 08:59 AM

I just set up the camera on a tripod and point it at the part of the sky that will yield the most meteors.  Just locate the constellation Perseus and aim there.

 

Manual, 30 seconds, f8, ISO100 or if you have a remote release, you can use Bulb and keep the aperture opened as long as you like.  Just be aware of light pollution.  If you have dark skies, no problem, but if you are in a typical suburban setting, if you leave the lens open for too long, your shot will become overwhelmed by the LP and you'll have a grayish white exposure.  

 

As for tonight, pure clouds here. :-(

 

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#5 TrailEx

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 09:20 AM

That's some good info there! Thanks for the links.

 

Now if only the shower peaked on saturday, I could camp out in a dark sky site...



#6 rospondek

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 03:18 AM

I'm soooooooooooooo(o) angry. I saw a few very big and bright ones but all of them was off frame.
For over 600 photos continuous I caught only one medium one (which was of course cut by the frame), and seven little ones (dwarfs). Yes, just like in the fairy tale Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs... The first year for like 5 years in which sky was totally cloudless and such a disappointment :(

Anyway here they are.
The Snow White
DSC7034.jpg

And the Dwarfs
DSC6778.jpgDSC6887.jpgDSC6959.jpgDSC7093.jpgDSC7119.jpgDSC7227.jpgDSC7451.jpg

For the next year I've got prepared AF-S DX NIKKOR 10-24mm F3.5-4.5G ED. I'll be observing the whole NE part of the sky! ;)
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#7 Bill Peppas

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:51 AM

The supposed to be "outburst" this year looked like a hoax to me.
Truly bad estimations by the astronomers.

 

In 2014 I think I saw a whole lot activity while this time... meh.

 

I had two cameras up, covering a very wide range of the skies ( 14mm & 18mm full frame ), not many meteoroids to choose from :(
Will try again today if there are no clouds again.

 

 

Just a WIP ( Work In Progress ) shot, the ISS passing by along with a few meteors:

 

fUaLjNA.jpg



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#8 rospondek

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 06:54 AM

First of all. A hoax, that's a good name for this years 'peak' of perseids ;)

Second of all. The photo is a stack right?

And I might be wrong (don't know your location) but that's doesn't looks like an ISS. Rather a plane. Just assuming by the dots.

ISS should be a straight line. It is not blinking. It is fading away at some point.

 

Like here:

up ISS

bottom left plane.

DSC3582.jpg



#9 Bill Peppas

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 07:01 AM

Good catch :D
Indeed it must be a plane, didn't pay attention to the blinking white spot in the middle, only spotted the continuous light trails



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#10 rospondek

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 02:42 PM

Yay! What I won?! :D

 

Your peak was peakier than mine :D 10 falling stars as I can see but they're so tiny.

 

The one I mentioned earlier, the off frame big one, was something like this one or even brighter.

0117img_3474.jpg

 

Really big and bright. Simply astonishing! But it is only in my head unfortunately :(

 

I don't know, maybe next year I'll drive away and with 10mm (instead of this years 50mm) will be better. I know it won't be the peak like this year (yea, right...) but they will be there like every year.



#11 Bill Peppas

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 04:03 PM

Let's add some context

 

UbFLZWW.jpg



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#12 TrailEx

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Posted 14 August 2016 - 10:50 PM

After two hours of observing, I had a pretty poor meteor count recorded on the camera. Of course, it didn't help that the spot I picked was strangled by trees and light pollution. On the bright side, two hours of imaging makes for some sweet star trails!

Attached Files



#13 rospondek

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 07:23 AM

I bet around 100 of perseids was falling right behind those trees. Sorry, bad luck... Just like in my case. They were falling under some other sky. Probably other galaxy as well...

;)

 

Any info bout settings and equipment? :)



#14 TrailEx

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 08:54 AM

Shot with my Canon 6D and a Rokinon 14mm F/2.8. Each frame was 30 seconds at F/2.8 and ISO 1600. There were around 170 images stacked.

 

There are actually several meteors in the shot, but they are dimmer than the stars so they're pretty hard to see. I can't figure out how people get such bright images of meteors... am I doing something technically wrong, or do I just need to brighten them in post?



#15 rospondek

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 10:24 AM

30s, f/2.8, 1600 ISO. Pretty dark place you've got there :)

 

From the technical point of view you did everything what you could do. Maximum aperture, very high ISO and exposition longer than 2s (as we all know perseids are visible only for 1 or 2 seconds) is everything you need to catch the most light you need.

What could make them dimmer in your case is the focal length but that's just the russian roulette.

You can shoot at 14mm and have the most of the sky covered catching probably more meteors but the meteors will be smaller and cause of that maybe a little dimmer.

Or you will use a little longer lens and had much bigger meteors but of course the sky you will cover will be much smaller which leads to missing more meteors.

 

I was shooting with widest I had at that time (50mm) but if I had my old lens (18-105mm) or the not-yet-delivered 10-24mm I'd choose the first option. I'd rather have 20 dimmer and maybe 2 very big and bright ones than only a few dimmer and the big ones just in my memory cause they were off frame ;)

 

Anyway I think people taking only the brightest they have and maybe extra lighten them up (brush+masking). And WB is set to the color of the meteor itself.

 

Something like that. It looks like you know what but it was corrected from the jpg so the quality has to be awful :)

Ub_FLZWW_2.jpg



#16 TrailEx

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 10:38 AM

I definitely need to take the plunge and learn PS so I can stack meteors onto a static background.

 

As far as the focal lengths go, it definitely felt like Russian roulette, because I had a 24 F/1.4 with me mounted on my secondary camera. I wasn't sure which lens to put on my primary, so I went with the 14mm, because the secondary camera is a full-spectrum camera, and the 24mm can accept filters while the 14mm cannot.

 

And the sky was not that dark actually, I just followed the principle of ETTR (expose to the right), and then crushed the highlights in LR to get rid of some of the light pollution. But judging by how blue the sky is in my shot, it did not get rid of all of it.



#17 rospondek

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 01:20 PM

It wasn't that bad. I actually like when the sky is blue with star trails. At some point when cutting exposure and other settings you would start to lose faint stars so I don't know if this is worth the work.

I said it was dark because in my location 30s on 2.8 and 1600 ISO will give you a pure white image ;)

 

And as for the stacking I'm not using PS for it. Too slow. StarStaX is good enough.

In Photoshop you can just add the meteor shots as an additional layers, delete/mask everything besides meteor and change the blending. Soft light or hard light should be enough to enhance it.



#18 David Pavlich

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Posted 15 August 2016 - 02:10 PM

Through my many years of sitting out watching meteor showers, I can tell you that predictions are hit and miss at best.  It's fun to just get out and watch especially if you have a camera working along with it.  Unfortunately, the region was in the throws of record rainfall.  Our home was on the eastern edge of it and while we got well over 6" of rain, it was nothing compared to just 25 miles from here where they got nearly 30".

 

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